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Point of Rocks in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Point of Rocks
Confederates Capture Train

— Gettysburg Campaign —
 
Point of Rocks<br>Confederates Capture Train Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Tom Fuchs, November 4, 2006
1. Point of Rocks
Confederates Capture Train Marker
 
Inscription. In mid-June 1863, with rumors of a pending reinvasion of Maryland by Confederate forces, most Baltimore and Ohio trains stopped running past here. As tension mounted, the New York Times reported that no trains were departing Baltimore, “except the mail train to Harpers Ferry and the accommodation for Frederick.” In the predawn hours of June 17, Confederate cavalry crossed the Potomac River and attacked Union cavalry at nearby Catoctin Station, while another unit captured a military train here. The train was carrying provisions for the Harpers Ferry garrison, which was moving from the imminent danger there to Baltimore. Four earlier trains had passed safely, and this was the last of the convoy. After first being attacked at Catoctin Stations, the train escaped to Point of Rocks, but here the engineer and conductor was captured together with fifteen passengers. The train, with its cargo of flour, was burned. Reports of the incident caused considerable anxiety in Frederick and the surrounding countryside. Before the end of the month, thousands of Union soldiers would pass by here on their way to cover the nearby gaps, knowing that Gen. Robert E. Lee’s army was on the other side of the mountains.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O), and the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location.
 
Markers in front of Point of Rocks Station Photo, Click for full size
By J. J. Prats, November 4, 2006
2. Markers in front of Point of Rocks Station
This view shows the B&O Railroad station, designed by E. Francis Baldwin and completed in 1876. It was built at the junction where the Metropolitan Branch from Washington (behind station) joins the Old Main Line from Baltimore (between the markers and the station), which continues west (towards the right). The Metropolitan Branch opened in 1873.
This station continues to serve passengers on the MARC Brunswick Line. Amtrak's Capitol Limited (trains 29 to Chicago and 30 to Washington) pass this station but do not stop.
 
39° 16.433′ N, 77° 32.021′ W. Marker is in Point of Rocks, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Clay Street (Maryland Route 28) east of Catoctin Mountain Highway (U.S. 15). Click for map. It is in the parking lot of the Point of Rocks railroad station. Marker is in this post office area: Point of Rocks MD 21777, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Point of Rocks (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Point of Rocks (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle at Point of Rocks (approx. half a mile away); Loudoun County / Maryland (approx. 0.8 miles away in Virginia); Taylorstown (approx. 2.7 miles away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Point of Rocks.
 
More about this marker. An “accommodation” is a train that stops at all stations and may also stop at farm houses, road crossings, and rail yards for the convenience of local patrons and railroad employees.
 
Regarding Point of Rocks. The B&O Railroad met and parallelled the C&O Canal a few hundred feet west of here, separated—by 1832 court order—by a high wall to prevent trains from spooking the mules that towed boats on the canal. Eventually the railroad dug a tunnel through Catoctin Mountain to separate itself from the canal.
 
Point of Rocks Station Photo, Click for full size
By Tom Fuchs, November 4, 2006
3. Point of Rocks Station
This view west from the MARC commuter train platform has the Metropolitan Line tracks in the foreground.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Impossible Challenge: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Maryland. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
2. Impossible Challenge II: Baltimore to Washington and Harpers Ferry from 1828 to 1994. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
3. The Met: A History of the Metropolitan Branch of the B&O Railroad, Its Stations and Towns. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
4. The Baltimore and Ohio In The Civil War. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
5. The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in the Potomac Valley (Golden Years of Railroading). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
6. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (Railroad Color History). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
7. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
8. Baltimore and Ohio's Capitol Limited and National Limited (Great Passenger Trains). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
9. Route of the National Limited (Baltimore and Ohio Passenger Service Volume 1). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
10. Route of the Capitol Limited (Baltimore and Ohio Passenger Service, Volume 2). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
11. The Great Road. The Building of the Baltimore and Ohio, the Nation's First Railroad 1828 - 1853. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
12. Chessie System (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on October 14, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
13. CSX (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on October 14, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,581 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on December 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   2. submitted on December 8, 2006, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3. submitted on December 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
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