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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Wabash River

 
 
Wabash River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, May 27, 2014
1. Wabash River Marker
Inscription.
South Side
“Oubache’ was the French name for the Wabash – an Indian word meaning white. La Salle in 1669, was the first white man to explore this stream. Long it had been a link in a well- used route for red warriors and traders between the Great Lakes and the Ohio. Under French control the route connected settlements which stretched from the Saint Lawrence River to the Gulf of Mexico.

On the banks of the Wabash George Rogers Clark wrested the Old Northwest from the British when he captured Vincennes. Not far from the Wabash, William Henry Harrison defeated the Prophet in the Battle of Tippecanoe, marking the beginning of the War of 1812. With peace came the building of the Wabash and Erie Canal along the old route. One of the world’s longest canals, it brought prosperity to interior Indiana and Ohio. erected 1958 Fort Recovery Historical Society

North Side
Wabash River One half mile west of here, the Wabash River, famed in song and story, has it’s beginning. After 40 miles of meandering indecision, the willow- lined stream enters Indiana, flows completely across and almost the full length of the Hoosier State, then enters the Ohio River just below Evansville, it passes through 475 miles of one of the richest and most beautiful regions of our country.

At present, Fort Recovery,

Wabash River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, May 27, 2014
2. Wabash River Marker
back side
just north of here, tragedy and victory were the lot of two American armies on the banks of the Wabash. In the Indian Wars, Gen. Arthur St. Clair lost three fourths of his command in 1791 when Little Turtle and his warriors surprised his small and badly equipped army. Three years later, Little Turtle and 2,000 attacked Fort Recovery located on the same site. The Indians were repulsed with great loss by Gen. Anthony Wayne’s soldiers.

A partial reconstruction of the pioneer fort and a towering stone monument in Fort Recovery honor those men who fought and died in these two engagements on the banks of the Wabash.
 
Erected 1958 by Fort Recovery Historical Society.
 
Location. 40° 21.164′ N, 84° 44.911′ W. Marker is near Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is at the intersection of Darke-Mercer County Line Rd (Ohio Route 49) and Darke - Mercer County Line, on the right when traveling north on Darke-Mercer County Line Rd. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1473 Darke-Mercer County Line Rd, Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Mississinewa (approx. 4.1 miles away); Samuel McDowell (approx. 4.4 miles away); Pioneer Cemetery

Wabash River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, May 27, 2014
3. Wabash River Marker
(approx. 4.4 miles away); Dr. Victor Grasson (approx. 4.4 miles away); Fort Recovery Monument (approx. 4.4 miles away); St. Clair's Defeat / Fort Recovery (approx. 4.4 miles away); Fort Recovery Civil War Veterans Memorial (approx. 4.4 miles away); Gen. Richard Butler (approx. 4.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Additional keywords. Gen. Arthur St. Clair Gen. Anthony Wayne
 
Categories. Wars, US Indian
 
Wabash River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Rev. Ronald Irick, May 27, 2014
4. Wabash River Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. This page has been viewed 354 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Rev. Ronald Irick of West Liberty, Ohio. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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