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Point of Rocks in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Point of Rocks
Point of Rocks During the War
 
Point of Rocks During the War Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Tom Fuchs, November 4, 2006
1. Point of Rocks During the War Marker
 
Inscription. The rail line immediately before you served as an important means of supply and communication during the Civil War (the station, and tracks to Washington, D.C., on the southern or right side of the station were built later). Here at Point of Rocks, formerly Trammelstown, the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad reached the banks of the Potomac River from Baltimore. This narrow strip of bottomland, which allowed passage beyond the Blue Ridge’s Catoctin and South Mountain ranges, had been the subject of a court fight decades earlier when the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal and the railroad sought to use it.

In May 1861, Col. Thomas J. (later Gen. “Stonewall”) Jackson convinced the railroad to consolidate its coal shipments at a specific time period. He then captured 56 locomotives and more than 300 rail cars by halting all train traffic east of Point of Rocks. In 1864, Confederate Lt. Col. John S. Mosby, in what became known as the “Calico Raid” or the “Crinoline Raid,” attacked the Union garrison here. Throughout the war, pro-Union families living in Loudoun County, Va., crossed the river here to shop.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the
 
Point of Rocks Station Today Photo, Click for full size
By Tom Fuchs, November 4, 2006
2. Point of Rocks Station Today
This station, designed by E. Francis Baldwin and completed in 1876 by the B&O Railroad, was built at the junction where the Metropolitan Branch from Washington (behind station) joins the Old Main Line from Baltimore (between the markers and the station), which continues west (towards the right). The Metropolitan Branch opened in 1873.
This station continues to serve passengers on the MARC Brunswick Line. Amtrak's Capitol Limited (trains 29 to Chicago and 30 to Washington) pass through here but do not stop.
 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O), and the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 16.434′ N, 77° 32.021′ W. Marker is in Point of Rocks, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Clay Street (Maryland Route 28) east of Catoctin Mountain Road (U.S. 15). Click for map. It is in the parking lot of the Point of Rocks railroad station. Marker is in this post office area: Point of Rocks MD 21777, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Point of Rocks (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Point of Rocks (approx. 0.3 miles away); Battle at Point of Rocks (approx. half a mile away); Loudoun County / Maryland (approx. 0.8 miles away in Virginia); Taylorstown (approx. 2.7 miles away in Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Point of Rocks.
 
Regarding Point of Rocks. The B&O Railroad met and parallelled the C&O Canal a few hundred feet west of here, separated—by 1832 court order—by a high wall to prevent trains from spooking the mules that towed boats on the canal. Eventually the railroad dug a tunnel through Catoctin Mountain to separate itself from the canal.
 
Point of Rocks Junction, Viewed from the Station Photo, Click for full size
By Tom Fuchs, November 4, 2006
3. Point of Rocks Junction, Viewed from the Station
During the Civil War the tracks on the left were not present and the station was probably a few blocks west, near the present-day US 15 bridge across the Potomac.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Impossible Challenge: The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Maryland. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
2. Impossible Challenge II: Baltimore to Washington and Harpers Ferry from 1828 to 1994. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
3. The Met: A History of the Metropolitan Branch of the B&O Railroad, Its Stations and Towns. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
4. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (Railroad Color History). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
5. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in the Potomac Valley (Golden Years of Railroading). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
6. Baltimore and Ohio in the Civil War. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
7. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
8. Baltimore and Ohio's Capitol Limited and National Limited (Great Passenger Trains). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
9. Route of the Capitol Limited (Baltimore and Ohio Passenger Service Volume 2). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
10. The Great Road: The Building of the Baltimore and Ohio, the Nation's First Railroad 1828 - 1853. (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
11. Route of the National Limited (Baltimore and Ohio Passenger Service Volume 1). (Submitted on May 2, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
12. Chessie System (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on October 14, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
13. CSX (MBI Railroad Color History). (Submitted on October 14, 2008, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.)
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,934 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on December 8, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
 
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