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Hubbardton in Rutland County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Battle of Hubbardton

Only Battlefield On Vermont Soil

 
 
Battle of Hubbardton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
1. Battle of Hubbardton Marker
Inscription.
Here on July 7, 1777 a successful rearguard action by Colonel Seth Warner’s Vermont, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire troops ended British pursuit under Generals Frazer and Reldesel. Thus, General St. Claire’s American army, retreating from Fort Ticonderoga and Mount Independence, was saved to fight near Bennington and Saratoga. Burgoyne’s 1777 drive to divide the colonies, first resisted at Hubbardton, ended in defeat at Saratoga.
 
Erected 1989 by Vermont Division for Historic Preservation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Battlefield Trails - Revolutionary War marker series.
 
Location. 43° 41.712′ N, 73° 8.308′ W. Marker is in Hubbardton, Vermont, in Rutland County. Marker is on Monument Hill Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5696 Monument Hill Road, Castleton VT 05735, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Hubbardton Battle Monument (a few steps from this marker); Germans Arrive, Americans Retreat (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Park (within
Marker in Hubbardton image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
2. Marker in Hubbardton
Mt. Zion can be seen in the photo, beneath the marker. The entire battlefield is visible from the summit, which might have been used by Tory and Indian scouts to spy on the American Army prior to the battle.
shouting distance of this marker); The Selleck Cabin (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); British Flank Near Mt. Zion (about 700 feet away); Monument Hill Charge (about 700 feet away); Dawn Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); Slate Pencil Manufacturing (approx. 3.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hubbardton.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers tell the story of the Battle of Hubbardton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Hubbardton Battlefield State Historic Site. One of the most successful rear guard actions in American history, the Battle of Hubbardton was the only Revolutionary War battle fought entirely in Vermont. (Submitted on July 14, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Hubbardton, July 7, 1777 at Hubbardton, Vermont. The American Revolutionary War website. (Submitted on July 14, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable EventsNotable PlacesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker on Hubbardton Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
3. Marker on Hubbardton Battlefield
This photo looks toward Monument Hill, where the Americans made a valiant stand against the charging British troops.
Stone Wall on Monument Hill image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
4. Stone Wall on Monument Hill
American forces used this stone wall atop Monument Hill for cover as they attempted to hold off the charging British troops.
Hubbardton Battlefield image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
5. Hubbardton Battlefield
The Americans fell back across this field when the British broke through at the stone wall on Monument Hill. They regrouped on the north side of the Castleton Road, today's Monument Hill Road.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,093 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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