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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu in Haut-Richelieu MRC, Quebec — French Canadian Region
 

First Railway in Canada

 
 
First Railway in Canada Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, June 17, 2011
1. First Railway in Canada Marker
Inscription. Canada's first steam railway, the Champlain and St. Lawrence, was opened in 1836 to better facilitate trade with the United States. It was built by promoters led by brewer John Molson and merchant-forwarder Jason C. Pierce. This 23-kilometre line expedited the movement of passengers and freight between Montréal and New York by linking La Prairie, on the St. Lawrence River and Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu. The wooden rails were replaced with iron in 1847, and the line was extended in 1851 to Rouses Point, New York, to form part of a major international railway network.
 
Erected by Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada and Parks Canada.
 
Location. 45° 18.157′ N, 73° 15.22′ W. Marker is in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec, in Haut-Richelieu MRC. Marker is at the intersection of Rue Frontenac and Jacques-Cartier Nord, on the right when traveling west on Rue Frontenac. Click for map. This marker is located on the grounds of the regional tourist information office. The tourist information office is located in an old railway station that dates back to 19th century. The marker is located near a 10-foot tall railway spike, which was erected in 1986 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the first railway. Marker
First Railway in Canada Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, June 17, 2011
2. First Railway in Canada Marker
(with giant railway spike and old railway station in background)
is at or near this postal address: 31 Frontenac Saint-Jean QC, Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu, Quebec J3B 7X2, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 18 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Former Grand Trunk Railway Station (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Saint-Jean (approx. 0.4 kilometers away); Fort Sainte-Thérèse (approx. 9.6 kilometers away); Fort Ste. Therese (approx. 10.5 kilometers away); Second Battle of La Prairie (approx. 15.2 kilometers away); Chambly Canal (approx. 16.2 kilometers away); St. Stephen's Anglican Church (approx. 16.3 kilometers away); General John Thomas (approx. 16.3 kilometers away).
 
Also see . . .  Canada's First Railway - The Canadian Encyclopedia. The success of the little railway was like a spark in dry tinder. The countryside spawned short lines in all directions. Although serious construction of railways did not occur in Canada until the 1850s, once it began it became a mania, dominating public policy, stimulating trade and industry, building cities, ferrying settlers westward, uprooting the First Nations, and stitching together an improbable country. (Submitted on April 20, 2014, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceMan-Made FeaturesRailroads & Streetcars
 
First Railway in Canada Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, June 17, 2011
3. First Railway in Canada Marker
Giant commemorative railway spike image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, June 17, 2011
4. Giant commemorative railway spike
(with marker to the left)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. This page has been viewed 527 times since then and 19 times this year. Last updated on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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