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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Trenton in Gibson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Female Collegiate Institute

Freed House

 
 
Female Collegiate Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 19, 2014
1. Female Collegiate Institute Marker
Inscription. Friendship Lodge No. 22, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, founded the Odd Fellows Female Collegiate Institute here in 1852. During the Civil War, Federal troops occupied the building, a two-story brick structure, and used it as a hospital. An accidental fire destroyed it. After the war, the Odd Fellows lodge filed a claim for the damage. The school was not rebuilt. Although Trenton survived military attacks and occupation by both sides during the war, like many towns it recovered slowly from the conflict.

Julius Freed, a German-Jewish merchant who moved to Trenton after the war, constructed this house in the institute site, helped the town recover. Freed served in the 15th Tennessee Infantry of the Army of the Tennessee and was wounded in the battles at Perryville and Chickamauga and during the Atlanta campaign. Captured during Hood’s attack on Nashville in December 1864, Freed became a prisoner of war until his release in May 1865. Although he had been in business in Memphis and Jackson before the conflict, Freed settled in Trenton and established a dry-goods store in partnership with another Jewish merchant, Julius Ebert. In 1871, Freed married Henrietta Cohn and constructed this Italianate-style house. Their sons became important local bankers and politicians, and the family made many civic contributions, including a fountain
Female Collegiate Institute Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 19, 2014
2. Female Collegiate Institute Marker
and baseball park. Dr. Frederick Freed gave the city a unique and valuable set of Veilleuse-Theieres (night-light teapots), and this collection housed at City Hall, has become a city symbol for Trenton.

(captions)
(lower left) Advertisement for J. Freed Clothing store Courtesy Fred M. Culp
(upper center) Julius Freed Courtesy Tennessee State Library & Archives
(upper right) J. Freed and Son Clothing store - Courtesy Fred M. Culp
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 58.833′ N, 88° 56.329′ W. Marker is in Trenton, Tennessee, in Gibson County. Marker is on East Eaton Street (Tennessee Route 104) west of South Lexington Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton TN 38382, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fighting for Trenton (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gibson County Confederate Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gibson County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); David Crockett
Freed House image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 19, 2014
3. Freed House
(approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Fighting for Trenton (approx. 0.4 miles away); Forrest at Trenton (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Fighting for Trenton (approx. 0.8 miles away); C.S.A. Camp Trenton (approx. 3.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 242 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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