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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Annapolis in Anne Arundel County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Tecumseh

 
 
Tecumseh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., March 15, 2008
1. Tecumseh Marker
Inscription.
Figurehead
of the
U.S.S.
Delaware

1817

Bronze Replica
Gift of the
Class of 1891

 
Erected 1891 by Class of 1891.
 
Location. 38° 58.935′ N, 76° 29.053′ W. Marker is in Annapolis, Maryland, in Anne Arundel County. Click for map. Marker is located on the grounds of the United States Naval Academy, on Stribling Walk near Bancroft Hall. A picture ID is required to enter the Academy grounds. Marker is in this post office area: Annapolis MD 21402, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. On this spot (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Joseph Nicholson Home Site and Bandstand (about 300 feet away); El Neptuno (about 300 feet away); St. Damian (about 300 feet away); Mexican War Midshipmen's Monument (about 300 feet away); St. Joseph (about 300 feet away); The Markers on the Plaza (about 400 feet away); One Hundredth Anniversary of the U.S. Naval Academy (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Annapolis.
 
Regarding Tecumseh. The original wooden
Tecumseh Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin W., March 15, 2008
2. Tecumseh Marker
View is looking NW down Stribling Walk. Bancroft Hall is behind the photographer.
figurehead was sent to the Naval Academy in 1866 after being salvaged from the wreck of the old ship of the line "Delaware," which had been sunk at Norfolk during the Civil War to prevent her from falling into Confederate hands. The builders of the "Delaware" intended the figurehead to portray Tamanend, the great chief of the Delawares, a lover of peace and friend of William Penn. But to the midshipmen of the period, there was nothing in the name of Tamanend to strike the imagination. The effigy was also known by various other names -- Powhatan, King Phillip, and finally Tecumseh -- a great warrior and thus heroic and appropriate to the midshipmen.

After 40 years of standing vigil in the Naval Academy's Yard, the winds, sun and rain began to take their toll. This prompted the Class of 1891 to raise funds for a new figurehead of Tecumseh to be immortalized in bronze. The old wooden figurehead's "brains" and "heart" were transferred to the new bronze statue for the sake of tradition.

Tecumseh has become not only the "God of 2.0" -- the passing grade point average at the academy -- but also the idol to whom loyal midshipmen give prayers and sacrificial offerings of pennies. Midshipmen offer a left-handed salute in tribute to Tecumseh, and they toss pennies his way
Tecumseh decorated for Commissioning Week, 2007 image. Click for full size.
May 17, 2007
3. Tecumseh decorated for Commissioning Week, 2007
for good luck in exams and athletic contests. Each year, Tecumseh is decked out in a coat of "war paint" for Parents' Weekend in August, Homecoming in the fall, before Army-Navy contests and for Commissioning Week.
 
Also see . . .  Smithsonian American Art Museum Inventory of American Sculpture (SIRIS). Control Number: IAS 75005885 , The sculpture is a bronze cast of the wooden ships figurehead carved by William Luke for the USS Delaware. This bronze replica was cast from the wooden original in 1930 at the U.S. Navy gun factory. (Submitted on April 25, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Tecumseh (Tamanend, Chief of Delaware Indians) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, March 5, 2010
4. Tecumseh (Tamanend, Chief of Delaware Indians)
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,474 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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