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Coral Gables in Miami-Dade County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Venetian Pool

 
 
Venetian Pool Marker image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
1. Venetian Pool Marker
Inscription. This pool was originally a quarry from which limestone was taken for the construction of early Coral Gables homes. In 1924, Denman Fink, artist-architect and uncle of Coral Gables founder George Merrick, transformed it into a unique pool resembling a natural lagoon in a Venetian setting. His design included bridges, towers, a casino and lush landscaping.

In the 1920s, the pool was used to promote Coral Gables and to highlight the city's distinctive architecture. William Jennings Bryan lectured here on the merits of living in Coral Gables. Jan Garber, Paul Whiteman, and their orchestras played for social functions. Annette Kellerman and Jackie Ott, "the aqua tot," were among the famous visiting swimmers. The pool was drained in 1926 for a performance in the basin by the Miami Grand Opera Company.

George Merrick's Coral Gables Corporation sold Venetian Pool to the City of Coral Gables in 1927.
 
Erected by Sponsored by the Coral Gables Junior Woman's Club in cooperation with The Historical Association of Southern Florida.
 
Location. 25° 44.733′ N, 80° 16.399′ W. Marker is in Coral Gables, Florida, in Miami-Dade County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of DeSoto Boulevard and Sevilla
Venetian Pool waterfall image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
2. Venetian Pool waterfall
Avenue, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2701 DeSoto Blvd, Miami FL 33134, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Coral Gables Merrick House (approx. ¼ mile away); Site of Packing House of Coral Gables Plantation (approx. 0.3 miles away); Coral Gables Congregational Church (approx. 0.4 miles away); Biltmore Hotel (approx. half a mile away); Troop 7 Log Cabin (approx. half a mile away); The Coral Gables Golf and Country Club (approx. half a mile away); U of M Opened Here (approx. 0.6 miles away); George E. Merrick (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Coral Gables.
 
Also see . . .
1. Venetian Pool. City of Coral Gables Parks & Recreation Division Website. Excerpt: “In its early days, the ‘Venetian Casino’ was the destination for many celebrities, including such movie stars as Johnny Weismuller and Esther Williams. The pool was also a site for orchestrated concerts, in which the pool was emptied of its 820,000 gallons of water and the orchestra would perform on the pool bottom. ” (Submitted on June 23, 2014.) 

2. Venetian Pool Wikipedia Entry. Excerpt: “The pool occupies a shallow quarry displacing some 820,000 US gallons (3,100 m3) of fresh
Venetian Pool Marker at front gate image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
3. Venetian Pool Marker at front gate
water daily from artesian wells, making it the largest freshwater pool in the United States. The pool ranges in depth from four feet to depths of over eight feet near the grand waterfall, with a two foot kiddy pool near the lifeguard station; the station is atop a bridge leading out to an island with two full size palm trees on it. A grotto, where natural water-filled caves stretch back over twelve feet into the hillside, is located across the pool from the island. There is a sandy sunning area for sunbathers and a café area that is commonly used for weddings and receptions. A walking path surrounds the whole complex.” (Submitted on June 23, 2014.) 

3. Wikipedia Entry for Coral Gables. Excerpt: “Coral Gables was one of the first planned communities, and prefigured the development of the gated community and the homeowners association. It is famous for its strict zoning regulations. The city was developed by George Edgar Merrick during the Florida land boom of the 1920s. The city’s architecture is almost entirely Mediterranean Revival Style. By 1926, the city covered 10,000 acres.” (Submitted on August 3, 2014.) 

4. Entry in MiamiBeaches.com. Excerpt: “The Venetian Pool is the only swimming pool on the National Register of Historic Places, and it’s no wonder why. This former rock quarry
Venetian Pool image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
4. Venetian Pool
was turned into the Venetian Pool in 1924, then called the “Venetian Casino,” and has remained the most beautiful and unique public pool in the country. Palm trees surround the Venetian Pool and the roaring waterfall drowns all sounds of traffic out—there’s not a building in sight. This 820,000 gallon pool is filled with fresh water from an underground aquifer and surrounded by the original coral rock. There are caves and waterfalls, little nooks carved into the coral, a sandy area for staying dry and an open swimming area. During the summer the pool is refilled daily from the artesian wells and there are never any chemicals in the water.” (Submitted on August 3, 2014.) 
 
Additional keywords. swimming pool
 
Categories. EntertainmentMan-Made Features
 
Venetian Pool image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
5. Venetian Pool
<i>Venetian Pool, Coral Gables</i> image. Click for full size.
circa 1930
6. Venetian Pool, Coral Gables
Pool mooring post image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
7. Pool mooring post
Venetian Pool - National Register of Historic Places Marker image. Click for full size.
By Marsha A. Matson, June 21, 2014
8. Venetian Pool - National Register of Historic Places Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida. This page has been viewed 432 times since then and 11 times this year. This page was the Marker of the Week Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida.   6. submitted on .   7, 8. submitted on , by Marsha A. Matson of Palmetto Bay, Florida. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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