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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester in Franklin County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Winchester's Civil War Sites

County Seceded before the State

 
 
Winchester's Civil War Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
1. Winchester's Civil War Sites Marker
Inscription. When Tennessee failed to secede from the Union on February 9, 1861, Franklin County residents met here at the courthouse. They listened to attorney Peter Turney’s forceful speech offering resolutions in favor of secession and reportedly adopted them unanimously. Turney raised a company in Winchester and recruited companies from surrounding communities to form the 1st Tennessee Infantry, which he offered to the Confederate government before April 9. The regiment assembled here at Mary Sharp College, elected Turney colonel on April 27, and soon marched to Decherd to board a train for Virginia, and it subsequently fought in that state and at Gettysburg. On June 8, Tennessee followed Franklin County’s lead and left the Union—the last state to do so.

During the war, the Oehmig house was used as a hospital for soldier with contagious diseases and called The Pest House. When the Union army occupied Winchester in 1863, several dwellings were seized for officers' quarters. The Federals used The Home Journal newspaper office on the Public Square, vacated by William J. Slatter who moved his presses to Georgia to publish The Army Bulletin. Confederate officers’ dwellings that survive today include Col. Tazewell Waller Newman’s house and the boyhood home of Gen. Alexander Peter Stewart.

Winchester City Cemetery
Close up of map shown on the marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
2. Close up of map shown on the marker
is the final resting place of Confederate Cols. Peter Turney and Albert Smith Marks, both also governors of Tennessee. Other veterans buried there include 100 Confederates and a few Federals. Soldiers who died in local houses after the Battles of Stones River and Chattanooga were buried in the city cemetery adjacent to John Wiley Templeton Confederate Memorial Cemetery.

(captions)
(lower left) Mary Sharp College - Courtesy Library of Congress
(upper center) Peter Turney; Albert Smith Marks Courtesy Tennessee Department of State
(upper right) Franklin County Courthouse by Gustavus A. Perry (US) Courtesy Mike Lougee
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 11.145′ N, 86° 6.786′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Tennessee, in Franklin County. Marker is at the intersection of 1st Avenue NW and South High Street, on the left when traveling west on 1st Avenue NW. Click for map. The marker is located on the grounds of the Winchester City Hall, the former site of Franklin County Courthouse. Marker is at or near this postal address: 7 South High Street, Winchester TN 37398, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Winchester's Civil War Sites Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
3. Winchester's Civil War Sites Marker
markers are within walking distance of this marker. Built 1914 (a few steps from this marker); In Memory of Our Franklin County War Dead (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); James Winchester (about 400 feet away); Secession (about 400 feet away); Colonel James Lewis (about 400 feet away); Mary Sharp College (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Mary Sharp College (approx. 0.2 miles away); Tullahoma Campaign (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Winchester.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Winchester City Hall image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 24, 2014
4. Winchester City Hall
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 409 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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