Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Exeter in Rockingham County, New Hampshire — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Ladd-Gilman House

 
 
Ladd-Gilman House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 28, 2010
1. Ladd-Gilman House Marker
Inscription. Built about 1721 as one of New Hampshire’s earliest brick houses, and enlarged and clapboarded in the 1750s, this dwelling served as the state treasury during the Revolution. Here were born John Taylor Gilman (1753-1828), who was elected governor for an unequalled total of fourteen years, and his brother Nicholas Gilman, Jr. (1755-1814), a signer of the U. S. Constitution. The house has been maintained since 1902 by the Society of the Cincinnati.
 
Erected 1991 by NH Division of Historical Resources and the NH Department of Transportation. (Marker Number 161.)
 
Location. 42° 58.916′ N, 70° 56.941′ W. Marker is in Exeter, New Hampshire, in Rockingham County. Marker is on Water Street, on the right. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Exeter NH 03833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Abraham Lincoln Speaks in New Hampshire (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Exeter NH War Memorial (about 800 feet away); Revolutionary Capital (about 800 feet away); Exeter Town House (about 800 feet away); Exeter NH Exeter Gas Works
Ladd-Gilman House Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Murray, August 4, 2016
2. Ladd-Gilman House Marker
Marker indicating Ladd Gilman House is on the National Register of Historic Places
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Second Burial Ground (approx. 0.2 miles away); Site of the First Mill At Falls of the Squamscott River (approx. 0.2 miles away); Powder House (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Exeter.
 
Regarding Ladd-Gilman House. A spectacular discovery was made in this historic building during renovations in 1985, when an alert workman noticed an aging document stashed behind insulation in the attic. It proved to be Exeter’s long-lost copy of the Declaration of Independence, which had arrived by horseback from Philadelphia on July 16, 1776.

Today the Ladd-Gilman house is the centerpiece of the American Independence Museum.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Taylor Gilman Biography - New Hampshire Division of Historical Resources. (Submitted on June 3, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
2. John Taylor Gilman - The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. (Submitted on June 3, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
3. Nicholas Gilman - The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. (Submitted on June 3, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Revolutionary
 
Wider View Looking South image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 28, 2010
3. Wider View Looking South
Looking East image. Click for full size.
By Roger W. Sinnott, May 28, 2010
4. Looking East
Ladd-Gilman House Marker image. Click for full size.
By James R. Murray, August 4, 2016
5. Ladd-Gilman House Marker
Additional marker inscribed State Treasury 1775-1789
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts. This page has been viewed 1,071 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.   2. submitted on , by James R. Murray of Elkton, Florida.   3, 4. submitted on , by Roger W. Sinnott of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.   5. submitted on , by James R. Murray of Elkton, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 13, 2016.
Paid Advertisement