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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mount Pleasant in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Avenue of Churches

Village in the City

 

—Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail —

 
Avenue of Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
1. Avenue of Churches Marker
Inscription. To Your Left is Canaan Baptist Church. Its relocation here from Georgia Avenue in 1963 was the fulfillment of pastor Rev. M. Cecil Mills's dream to preside over the first African American church on this avenue of churches. The congregation paraded from their old church to the new and celebrated for an entire month.

Canaan Baptist replaced Gunton-Temple Memorial Presbyterian Church, whose white congregation had moved to Bethesda, Maryland. Like many white Washingtonians in the period following World War II, they left because of school desegregation and also because the suburbs offered newer housing.

Just across 16th Street is St. Stephen and the Incarnation, known as the first racially integrated Episcopal Church in the city. During the controversial tenure of Father William Wendt (1960-1978), St. Stephen's also became, known for its political activism. Father Wendt came under fire in 1967 for inviting civil rights activist H. Rap Brown to speak in the church. In 1974 he was censured by Episcopal Church leaders for permitting a woman to celebrate the Eucharist before the practice was accepted.

During the riots following the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King's assassination in 1968, St. Stephen's distributed emergency food and supplies.

The Northbrook Apartments across Newton Street were built in 1916
Avenue of Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
2. Avenue of Churches Marker
by prolific developer Harry Wardman, known for his blocks of substantial rowhouses and grand apartment buildings. As you walk to Sign 6, be sure to notice two of Mount Pleasant's original wood frame houses: 1626 and 1640 Newton Street.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 5.)
 
Location. 38° 55.993′ N, 77° 2.193′ W. Marker is in Mount Pleasant, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is at the intersection of Sixteenth Street and Newton Place (M. Cecil Mills Way) when traveling south on Sixteenth Street. Click for map. Marker is in front of Canaan Baptist Church. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mount Pleasant: The Immigrants' Journey (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sacred Heart Academy (about 600 feet away); Upheaval and Activism (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Wilson Center (approx. 0.3 miles away); Main Street (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fashionable 16th Street (approx. 0.4 miles away); Nob Hill (approx. half a mile away); Social Justice (approx. half a mile away).
 
Categories. African AmericansChurches, Etc.Man-Made Features
 
Avenue of Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
3. Avenue of Churches Marker
Avenue of Churches Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
4. Avenue of Churches Marker
In front of Canaan Baptist Church
Parade image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
5. Parade
Fellow members of the Columbia Elks Lodge No. 85 conveyed Rev. M. Cecil Mills to Canaan Baptist Church's new home, June 1963.
Close-up of photo on marker
Canaan Baptist Church
The Senior Ushers Board of Canaan Baptist Church, 1969 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
6. The Senior Ushers Board of Canaan Baptist Church, 1969
Close-up of photo on marker
Rev. William A. Wendt, 1975 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
7. Rev. William A. Wendt, 1975
Close-up of photo on marker
The Washington Post
H. Rap Brown image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
8. H. Rap Brown
H. Rap Brown speaks to supporters at St. Stephen's Church, 1967
Close-up of photo on marker
Emergency image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
9. Emergency
An area resident leaves St. Stephen's with emergency supplies,April 6, 1968.
Close-up of photo on marker
Harry Wardman image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
10. Harry Wardman
Washington's prolific developer
Close-up of photo on marker
Canaan Baptist Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
11. Canaan Baptist Church
Gargoyle image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
12. Gargoyle
at Canaan Baptist Church
St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
13. St. Stephen and the Incarnation Episcopal Church
St. Stephen & the Incarnation Episcopal Church sign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
14. St. Stephen & the Incarnation Episcopal Church sign
St. Stephen's Church

1957 - First integrated Episcopal Church in DC

1969 - Loaves and Fishes feeding program begins: hot meals still served to anyone in need Saturdays and Sundays at Noon

Today: Still serving God in this neighborhood. Please Join Us!
1626 Newton Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 15, 2013
15. 1626 Newton Street
built in 1884
1640 Newton Street image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 15, 2013
16. 1640 Newton Street
went up in 1890
Map - You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 14, 2013
17. Map - You Are Here
Stop 5 on the Mount Pleasant Heritage Trail
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 374 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on November 21, 2016.
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