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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

“Salubria”

 
 
Panel 1: "Welcome to Salubria" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller
1. Panel 1: "Welcome to Salubria"
Inscription.
Panel 1:
Welcome to Salubria
This location, Salubria, was a historic site. It has intact archaeological evidence of Woodland Era Indian encampments from 1300-1600 A.D. The Piscataway–Conoy was one of the tribes that frequently inhabited the region. In 1687, Col.John Addison acquired acreage later called Oxon Hill, which he devoted to tobacco growing. Notably, during the Revolutionary War, John Hanson, one of the Presidents of the Continental Congress, died at Oxon Hill.

In 1830, John H. Bayne built a house called Salubria here on this land which had been carved from Oxon Hill. He was a prominent doctor, horticulturist, educator and politician. Bayne trained his slaves to assist him in the development of innovative methods to grow fresh produce for the nation’s new capital.

The multi-faceted Salubria story is presented in the Memorial Garden. At the Garden is a public memorial dedicated to the Emancipation of all enslaved people in Maryland on November 1, 1864. Also, onsite is the Potomac River Heritage Visitors Center. It displays Salubria’s history of racial and economic developments and directs visitors to nearby historic houses, farms and historic St. John’s Broad Creek Church. Directions to the Gardens and Visitors Center are located on the mall directory.

[Rendering
Panel 1: "Welcome to Salubria" - at the fountain edge, lower right, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 29, 2013
2. Panel 1: "Welcome to Salubria" - at the fountain edge, lower right,
in Tanger Outlets, northwest intersection
of Oxon Hill’s
“Salubria House”]

Panel 2:
You Are Standing at Historic Salubria

Following his 1827 marriage, Dr. John H. Bayne constructed a two story, columned, wood framed house a few feet from this marker. Over the years the house was expanded; the southward extension included a 5 by 18 foot, one-and-a-half story structure where Dr. Bayne practiced medicine. “Salubria” means “healthy, beneficial”.

The slave population at Salubria grew from 3 or 4 in the 1830s to 19 as recorded in the 1860 census. There were three slave houses. Archaeology failed to identify them. One of the slaves was Judah, a 14 year old girl whose story was one of the most graphic and tragic in the annals of Maryland history.

Property records and archaeology have identified sites of a green house, dairy, pump house and farm storage buildings; none survived. Fire damaged and then destroyed the main house.

[Rendering of Oxon Hill’s “Salubria House”]

Discover more of the Salubria story in the Potomac River Heritage Visitors Center and the Salubria Memorial Garden here at the Tanger Outlets at National Harbor. Directions to the Visitors Center and the Garden are located on the mall directory.

This plaque was produced by representatives of the African
Marker Panel 2 - "You Are Standing at Historic Salubria" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 16, 2013
3. Marker Panel 2 - "You Are Standing at Historic Salubria"
American Heritage Presentation Group, the Broad Creek Historic District and the community. ... Financed by The Peterson Companies and Tanger Outlets
.
Dedicated: November 22, 2013


 
Erected 2013 by The Peterson Companies and Tanger Outlets.
 
Location. 38° 47.758′ N, 77° 0.074′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Oxon Hill Road (Maryland Route 414) south of Tanger Blvd. Click for map. Marker panels are in the northwest and southeast intersections of the open-air, pedestrian-only walkways in the Tanger Outlet Mall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 6800 Oxon Hill Road, Suite 399, Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Judah and Resistance (approx. ¼ mile away); Dr. John H. Bayne of Salubria “Prince of Horticulture” (approx. ¼ mile away); Salubria Changed the Future of the Potomac Valley (approx. ¼ mile away); Slavery in the Potomac Valley (approx. ¼ mile away); Dr. John H. Bayne: A Leader In His Community (approx. ¼ mile away); Emancipation in Maryland (approx. ¼ mile away); Front Door to Maryland History (approx. ¼ mile away); John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Related marker.
Marker Panel 2, together with an exhibit of bricks salvaged from a Salubria building foundation, image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 29, 2013
4. Marker Panel 2, together with an exhibit of bricks salvaged from a Salubria building foundation,
"... arranged to reflect the six columns of the Salubria Manor House. Their number, 19, equals the 1860 slave population here at Salubria."
Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Prince Georgian: "Salubria - A Maryland Plantation Home", by Pauline Collins (1992). . . . Tragedy struck the Bayne family in the 1830,s when Dr. Bayne's two sons, George and John, seven and five years of age, were poisoned by their young slave nursemaid, fourteen year old Juda (Judith). She also confessed to setting fire to Salubria in 1833 and the year before had poisoned the doctor's baby daughter, Catherine. She was tried and hanged in Upper Marlborough, thereby earning the dubious distinction of being the youngest female ever executed in American legal history. Dr. Bayne was not only a prominent doctor, but an active participant in horticulture and politics. He farmed his own land and his father's lands and is credited with taking the tomato out of the garden curiosity class and making it a field crop. He was also a close associate of Charles B. Calvert of Riverdale, and assisted him in the planning of the College of Agriculture at the University of Maryland. President Lincoln gave Dr. Bayne a commission as a high-ranking surgeon in the Union Army during the Civil War. . . . Salubria was in good condition until the late 1970's. It caught fire in 1981 and is no longer occupied. The house and surrounding property were offered for sale and the family
Tanger Outlets, southeast intersection near Marker Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, November 29, 2013
5. Tanger Outlets, southeast intersection near Marker Panel 2
had hoped it would be purchased and restored by M-NCPPC. But in September of 1989, Ronald Cohan Investments announced development plans that included an office park and hotel north of historic Salubria. . . .
(Submitted on December 31, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Salubria PlantationTragedy. (Submitted on December 31, 2013, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
3. National Harbor, Maryland. - a "census-designated place" (resort community) under development on the site of the former Salubria Plantation. (Submitted on July 2, 2014, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. "National Harbor", Judith: ["Juda","Judah"]
 
Categories. African AmericansAntebellum South, USNative AmericansNotable Events
 
Tanger Outlets, "National Harbor" - originally, "Salubria" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, December 25, 2013
6. Tanger Outlets, "National Harbor" - originally, "Salubria"
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 618 times since then and 52 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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