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Pisgah Forest in Transylvania County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Allison-Deaver House

A Case of Mistaken Identity

 
 
Allison-Deaver House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
1. Allison-Deaver House Marker
Inscription. This was the home of William Deaver and his wife, Margaret Patton Deaver. It was the scene of a tragic shooting in February 1865, a consequence of the tumult that the Civil War created among North Carolinians.

When the war began, a few Transylvania County men enlisted in the Union army, but most joined the Confederate forces. Deaverís son James Patton Deaver (1843-1889) enlisted for a year in June 15, 1861, in the 25th North Carolina Infantry. Mustered in as a sergeant, Deaver was promoted to lieutenant in 1862, before being discharged. He was commissioned a captain in the 14th Battalion North Carolina Troops on April 14, 1864, and provided homeland defense and procured military supplies.

Deaver, like other Confederate commanders in the area, was ordered to arrest armed Confederate deserted and Union partisans who were hiding in the mountains, forming gangs called “bushwhackers,” and plundering civilians. On the evening of February 24, 1865, when Deaver was home on leave but at a neighborís house, such a gang surrounded the Deaver home and called, “Captain Deaver!” Seventy-year-old William Deaver, once a Buncombe County militia captain, stepped through the doorway into the gloom and said, “I am Captain Deaver. Who is it?” The outlaws fired, killing him and then escaped despite
Allison-Deaver House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
2. Allison-Deaver House Marker
the efforts of James Deaver to track them down.

After the war, James Deaver moved to Georgia to escape his fatherís fate but soon returned to Transylvania County. He served two terms as a state representative and one as a state senator. Deaver died of a heart attack at age forty-five.

(sidebar)
Benjamin Allison constructed part of this house, one of the oldest frame dwellings west of the Blue Ridge, about 1815. Allison sold the dwelling to William Deaver in 1830 and moved farther west to Webster. Deaver built an addition and remodeled the house in the popular Greek Revival style. The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979.

(captions)
(upper center) Capt. James Deaver Courtesy James P. Deaver IV; James Deaver, postwar photograph Courtesy Transylvania County Historical Society
(upper right) Allison-Deaver House, 1961 before restoration Courtesy Transylvania County Historical Society
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 16.586′ N, 82° 42.067′ W. Marker is in Pisgah Forest, North Carolina, in Transylvania County.
Allison-Deaver House-Sign at the Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
3. Allison-Deaver House-Sign at the Entrance
Marker is on Asheville Highway (State Highway 280) 0.2 miles north of Pisgah Highway (U.S. 276), on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2753 Asheville Hwy, Pisgah Forest NC 28768, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Estatoe Path (approx. 0.3 miles away); Brevard College (approx. 3.2 miles away); The Weaver College Bell (approx. 3.2 miles away); Weaver College Bell Tower (approx. 3.2 miles away); College Stone Wall and Gate (approx. 3.3 miles away); Transylvania County Courthouse (approx. 3.5 miles away); In Honor and Memory (approx. 3.5 miles away); St. Philip's Parish (approx. 3.5 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Allison-Deaver House image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, April 26, 2014
4. Allison-Deaver House
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 291 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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