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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Holland in Bell County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Holland Community

 
 
Holland Community Texas Historical Marker image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, June 29, 2014
1. Holland Community Texas Historical Marker
Inscription. Present-day Holland has its origins in three different settlements. Settlers first came here during the 1830s to farm the area’s fertile soil. A community named Mountain Home (0.5 mi SE) formed along Darrs Creek and included a school, church, businesses and a cotton gin. A post office opened in 1870, with James Shaw serving as postmaster.

In 1874, James R. “Rube” Holland (1847-1912), a Civil War veteran, came to Bell County from Arkansas. In 1878, he built a steam-powered cotton gin on his property three miles southwest of Mountain Home. The next year, a post office named Holland opened in a store near the gin; Alfred Evans (1810-1896), a former state representative and veteran of the Indian Wars and the U.S. - Mexico War, was appointed postmaster.

In 1881, the Missouri-Kansas-Texas Railroad passed through this area. G.M. Dodge (1831-1916), a Civil War veteran and civil engineer, purchased land for this town site, which became known as (New) Mountain Home. Businesses moved from Old Mountain Home to this new town, and in 1882, the Holland Post Office moved here as well. The community adopted the name Holland by the mid-1880s. The new town grew quickly; immigrants, primarily Czechs and Germans, soon came here and helped the farming community become a leading producer of cotton. A rural telephone system
Holland Community Marker setting image. Click for full size.
By QuesterMark, June 29, 2014
2. Holland Community Marker setting
was started in 1902 and electricity was connected in 1915. By 1920, Holland had several churches, two banks, two hotels, noted schools, four cotton gins, an opera house and a population of over 1,000 residents. A volunteer fire department officially organized in 1929. Today, Holland persists as an agricultural community rich in heritage and history.
Marker is property of the State of Texas

 
Erected 2009 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 15915.)
 
Location. 30° 52.776′ N, 97° 24.321′ W. Marker is in Holland, Texas, in Bell County. Marker is at the intersection of West Travis Street and North Lexington Street, on the right when traveling east on West Travis Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Holland TX 76534, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Woman's Study Club of Holland (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Post Oak Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Bartlett Electric Cooperative (approx. 2.9 miles away); Site of German-English School (approx. 4.9 miles away); St. John Lutheran Church
Holland Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 6, 2015
3. Holland Community Marker
View to north, N. Lexington St in background
(approx. 5 miles away); Site of Booker T. Washington School (approx. 5.7 miles away); Stockton Family Cemetery (approx. 5.8 miles away); Bartlett Grammar School (approx. 5.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Holland.
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Holland Community Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 6, 2015
4. Holland Community Marker
Located at northeast corner of intersection
of W. Travis St and N. Lexington St
Holland Business District image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 6, 2015
5. Holland Business District
View to east
First National Bank Building image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 6, 2015
6. First National Bank Building
Building is located 50 yards east of the marker
Holland Grain Silos image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, October 6, 2015
7. Holland Grain Silos
Located east of business district along railroad tracks
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas. This page has been viewed 225 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by QuesterMark of Fort Worth, Texas.   3, 4. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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