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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Arlington in Tarrant County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Site of Bird's Fort

(One Mile East)

 
 
Site of Bird's Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 30, 2014
1. Site of Bird's Fort Marker
Plaque at bottom reads "This marker was relocated to River Legacy Parks in 2003. The Bird's Fort site is about 1-1/4 miles North-Northeast of this location."
Inscription.
In an effort to attract settlers to the region and to provide protection from Indian raids, Gen. Edward H. Tarrant of the Republic of Texas Militia authorized Jonathan Bird to establish a settlement and military post in the area. Bird's Fort, built near a crescent-shaped lake one mile east in 1841, was the first attempt at Anglo-American colonization in present Tarrant County. The settlers, from the Red River area, suffered from hunger and Indian problems and soon returned home or joined other settlements.

In August 1843, troops of the Jacob Snively expedition disbanded at the abandoned fort, which consisted of a few log structures. Organized to capture Mexican gold wagons on the Santa Fe Trail in retaliation for raids of San Antonio, the outfit had been disarmed by United States forces.

About the same time, negotiations began at the fort between Republic of Texas officials Gen. Tarrant and Gen. George W. Terrell and the leaders of nine Indian tribes. The meetings ended on September 29, 1843, with the signing of the Bird's Fort Treaty. Terms of the agreement called for an end to existing conflicts and the establishment of a line separating Indian lands from territory open for colonization.

(supplemental)
This marker was relocated to River Legacy Park in 2003. The Bird's Fort site is about
Site of Bird's Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 30, 2014
2. Site of Bird's Fort Marker
1- miles north-northeast of this location.
 
Erected 1980 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4732.)
 
Location. 32° 47.319′ N, 97° 6.002′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Texas, in Tarrant County. Marker can be reached from River Leagcy Park Trail 0.2 miles west of North Collins Street (Farm to Market Road 157), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is located on the hike & bike trail, near the West Fork Trinity River bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Arlington TX 76011, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Sloan-Journey Expedition of 1838 (here, next to this marker); Site of Arlington Downs Racetrack (approx. 3.3 miles away); Carver Dixon King (approx. 3.3 miles away); Booker T. Washington School (approx. 3.4 miles away); Bankhead Highway Through Arlington (approx. 3.5 miles away); Arlington Downs Racetrack and Fountain (approx. 3.6 miles away); Harrison Cemetery (approx. 4.5 miles away); Alexander Dobkins Family Cemetery (approx. 4.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Arlington.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. See reference to Bird's Fort on related marker description.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
West Fork of the Trinity River Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 30, 2014
3. West Fork of the Trinity River Bridge
Bridge located near marker crossing the West Fork of the Trinity
Trinity River image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 30, 2014
4. Trinity River
View south from bridge near marker looking south. Note kayak / canoe put-in at bottom of page, part of the River Legacy Parks Paddling Trail.
River Legacy Parks Paddling Trail image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, July 30, 2014
5. River Legacy Parks Paddling Trail
Marker is located in the River Legacy Park.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 341 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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