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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Royalton in Niagara County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Belva Lockwood

 
 
Belva Lockwood Marker On Post image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
1. Belva Lockwood Marker On Post
Inscription.
[on post]
First Woman to argue before the U S Supreme Court, 1879. Presidential candidate, 1884 and 1888, for the National Equal Rights party. George E. Pataki, Governor

[on stone]
Near this spot stood the log cabin birthplace of Belva A. Bennett, 1830 - 1917. As Belva Lockwood, she became the first woman to practice law before the U.S. Supreme Court. She was also the first woman to run for the office of President of the United States in 1884 and 1888. Town of Royalton.
 
Erected by George Pataki, Governor of New York; Town of Royalton.
 
Location. 43° 10.059′ N, 78° 29.661′ W. Marker is in Royalton, New York, in Niagara County. Marker is on Griswold Street (County Route 905) half a mile south of Graham Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Markers are well hidden between two mature roadside trees. A nelpful white-on-green directional sign is opposite the markers. A twin white-on-green sign is at the intersection of Griswold Street and Rochester Road (NY Route 31). Marker is in this post office area: Middleport NY 14105, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Asher Freeman (approx. 2 miles away); Abdullah

Belva Lockwood Marker On Stone image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
2. Belva Lockwood Marker On Stone
(approx. 2.2 miles away); Early Home (approx. 2.7 miles away); Charles Stielow (approx. 3 miles away); Early Church (approx. 3.1 miles away); Neuter Fort (approx. 3.2 miles away); Canal Bridge No. E-220 (approx. 3.7 miles away); Trinity Complex (approx. 3.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Royalton.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Academy attended by Belva Lockwood.
 
Also see . . .  Belva Lockwood - Wikipedia. (Submitted on August 3, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.)
 
Categories. Civil RightsPolitics
 
Belva Lockwood Markers image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
3. Belva Lockwood Markers
Wider View Belva Lockwood Markers image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
4. Wider View Belva Lockwood Markers
Southward View Belva Lockwood Markers image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
5. Southward View Belva Lockwood Markers
Markers are between the large trees at right.
Southward View Green Belva Lockwood Markers Sign image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
6. Southward View Green Belva Lockwood Markers Sign
Look for this white-on-green directional sign on the left because the markers are not visible approaching at speed on the road.
Northward View Belva Lockwood Markers image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
7. Northward View Belva Lockwood Markers
Markers are between the two large trees at left.
Northward View Belva Lockwood Markers Sign image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, July 20, 2014
8. Northward View Belva Lockwood Markers Sign
White-on-green sign for the markers.
Belva Ann Lockwood image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
9. Belva Ann Lockwood
1913 Portrait by Nellie Mathas Horne in the National Portrait Gallery, Washington DC.

"Belva Ann Lockwood flatly rejected the gallantry of those who sought to protect women from the more rigorous aspects of life.Denied the right to teach physical education to her female pupils, Lokwood protested until that privilege was granted. Barred later from utilizing a hard-won law degree in many courts, she lobbied for a congressional bill permitting women to argue before the Supreme Court and, on its passage in 1879, became the first woman admitted to practice in that tribunal. In 1884 Lockwood realized that although she could not vote, she could seek public office. By late summer, before cheering supporters, she became the first woman to formally declare her candidacy for president. In this portrait Lockwood appears in robes presented to her in 1908 on receiving an honorary degree from her alma mater, Syracuse University."
Belva Ann Lockwood image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 14, 2015
10. Belva Ann Lockwood
Born Oct. 24, 1830
Died May 19, 1817
Lockwood
Headstone in Congressional Cemetery, Washington, DC

“Born Belva Ann Bennett in Royalton, New York. At age 22 with a young daughter, Lura, Lockwood was widowed. She became a teacher and school principal and described herself as ‘an earnest, zealous laborer in the cause of Education, Sabbath School and Missionary work, and an indefatigable advocate of the Temperance Cause…’ At age 36, she came to Washington, DC ‘to see what was being done at this great political centre—this seething pot, to learn something of the practical workings of the machinery of government, and to see what the great men and women of the country felt and thought.’ She obtained a teaching position and spent her free time listening to the debates in Congress and the Supreme Court, which fostered a fascination with law and lawmaking. She married again, to Ezekiel Lockwood, and acted on her ambition to be a lawyer. By then she was already an established leader and a spokeswoman for the DC suffrage movement, and a lobbyist for women’s equal employment. After years of adversity, Lockwood was finally presented with her diploma and admitted to the DC bar in 1873. The first woman licensed to practice law, she was an ardent lobbyist for women’s rights and frequently argued before Congressional committees against sex discrimination. Her law practice in her own name survived for 40 years, and she managed to earn respect for her legal accomplishments. Despite her success, the number of female lawyers remained a small handful, a pattern which did not change until the mid-1970s. She fought to gain the right to present cases to federal courts, until finally the Senate passed the legislation which allowed her to present arguments before the U.S. Supreme Court. In 1884, she was the Presidential candidate for the Equal Rights Party. Her candidacy caused her business to decline. She relied on her pension from her husband’s death, lecture fees, and her tenants, supported not only herself but her widowed mother and the orphaned son who survived her daughter. Although she died in 1917 before seeing her dream fulfilled, Lockwood’s tireless efforts to gain women the right to vote had a profound impact on the creation of the 19th Amendment in 1920.” — Congressional Cemetery Educators, Agitators & Lawyers walking tour pamphlet.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. This page has been viewed 418 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.   9, 10. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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