Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Little Falls in Herkimer County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mohawk River

 
 
Mohawk River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
1. Mohawk River Marker
Inscription.
Since roads were few and were usually poorly maintained, lakes, rivers, and steams became the highways of colonial America. The Mohawk River is a natural break in the Appalachian Mountain chain that runs from Maine to Georgia. It links the Hudson River in the east with Wood Creek, Oneida Lake, the Oswego River, and Lake Ontario in the west. By carrying boats and their cargo around obstructions in these waterways or from one waterway to another, travelers could access the interior of the continent. Settlers, travelers, merchants, and soldiers traveling on the Mohawk River favored bateaux.
 
Erected by Herkimer Home State Historic Site.
 
Location. 43° 1.827′ N, 74° 48.867′ W. Marker is in Little Falls, New York, in Herkimer County. Marker can be reached from New York State Route 169, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is located on the grounds of the Herkimer Home State Historic Site. Marker is in this post office area: Little Falls NY 13365, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Palatines (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); General Nicholas Herkimer's Mansion (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Bateau
Mohawk River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
2. Mohawk River Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); From This Point (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Memory of the Men (approx. mile away); General Nicholas Herkimer Monument (approx. mile away); Herkimer Homestead Cemetery (approx. mile away); General Nicholas Herkimer (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Little Falls.
 
More about this marker. Several illustrations appear on the marker. At the upper left is a picture of men rowing a bateaux with a caption of “Bateaux, or flat-bottomed boats, floated in shallow water and were pointed at both ends for maneuverability. Area farmers used these boats to send their wheat and peas downriver to Albany and New York and their fresh vegetables and dairy products to the British forts to the west.”
A picture at the upper right of the marker shows colonists trading furs with Indians by a waterfall. The caption reads “Detail from William Faden, A Map of the Inhabited Part of Canada, London, 1777. Courtesy Winterthur Museum.”
Below this is a map of New York State indicating the locations of waterways used to cross the state and other
Mohawk River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
3. Mohawk River Marker
significant landmarks. These include Hudson River, Mohawk River, Herkimer Home, Wood Creek, Fort Stanwix, Oneida Lake, Oswego River and Lake Ontario. It has a caption of “The Mohawk River was strategically important because it linked the Hudson River and the Atlantic Ocean with the Great Lakes and the interior of North America.”
The picture Sunrise at Fort Stanwix, 1927, by Edward P. Buyck, reproduced courtesy of the Rome Historical Society is at the bottom right of the marker and includes a caption of “The British built Fort Stanwix in 1758 to protect the portage between the Mohawk River and Wood Creek.”
 
Categories. Colonial EraWaterways & Vessels
 
Marker at the Herkimer Home State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
4. Marker at the Herkimer Home State Historic Site
The Bateau image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 30, 2014
5. The Bateau
A bateau, the boat of choice used by travelers on the Mohawk River, is located nearby in Herkimer Home Stae Historic Site.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 206 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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