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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Carlisle in St. Joseph County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Historic Lincoln Highway

Main Street Across America

 
 
The Historic Lincoln Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
1. The Historic Lincoln Highway Marker
Inscription.

—Lincoln Highway—
The Nation’s First Coast-to-Coast Auto Road

Once called the Main Street Across America, it all began on September 10, 1912, when a group of industrialists led by Carl Fisher of Indianapolis Motor Speedway fame, envisioned a continuous improved highway from the Atlantic to the Pacific. The road would be open to lawful traffic without toll charges and was to be a living memorial to President Abraham Lincoln.

When the route was announced in 1913 it was 3,389 miles long and stitched together existing roadbeds. New sections were built to demonstrate state of the art road construction methods and residents were asked to join the Lincoln Highway Association to show their support for this patriotic and private road building effort.

That highway still exists, and for many it holds an allure in much the same way that it did in its heyday during the 1920s and ’30s. From the beginning the highway was a real tourist destination, and now it’s even more so because people have to make an effort to go that way and fulfill their desires to travel the back roads of America. Along the way tourists discover towns such as New Carlisle, Rolling Prairie, Deep River, and Valparaiso. Each town and city along the route has a unique story and culture making
The Historic Lincoln Highway Marker image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
2. The Historic Lincoln Highway Marker
Located next to the New Carlisle Town Hall
travel more interesting than that found on modern interstates.

Although not a highway in contemporary terms, the Lincoln Highway today is a system of existing roadways that crosses 13 states and stretches nearly 3,400 miles from Times Square in New York city to Lincoln Park, San Francisco.

Lincoln Highway Time Line
The Northern Indiana Motorist
Grade Separation Replaces New Carlisle “Death Crossing” On Lincoln Highway
Viaducts and Paving To Be Finished Early This Summer

The “Death Crossing” of New Carlisle—heralded
Markers in front of New Carlisle Town Hall image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
3. Markers in front of New Carlisle Town Hall
as the most dangerous railroad crossing on the Lincoln Highway, and with the largest number of victims to its credit of any crossing on the coast-to-coast route—soon will be a matter of history. Within a few weeks’ time the viaducts will be completed and that portion of the highway paved. The Chicago, South Bend & Northern Indiana Railway, the Chicago Lake Shore & South Bend Railway and the New York Central Railroad will be served by separate viaducts, two of which are completed.
     The three railroads enter New Carlisle from the southeast, crossing the Lincoln Highway at an angle. In order to eliminate constructing viaducts at this point, the course of the route was changed. The highway will resemble a huge S in shape upon completion, and will pass under the bridges at the straight point in the curve, at right angles to the tracks. The first bridge on the New Carlisle side of the separation accommodates the main line tracks of the New York Central, the second the Lake Shore Line and the third, the Northern Indiana tracks.
     The western end of the S curve has been heavily graded and a 700-foot retaining wall will be built on the south side of the road passing under New York Central bridge. The excavation necessary for the construction of this portion of pavement and the retaining wall is shown in the accompanying illustration.* The two finished viaducts, and
US 20 / Lincoln Highway image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, 08
4. US 20 / Lincoln Highway
Entering New Carlisle from the east under the railroad viaduct
the one nearing completion also are shown.*
     The stretch of Lincoln Highway at the grade separation, from the point where its course has been changed east of the tracks to the point where it will connect with the old route at the eastern edge of New Carlisle, will be 1.09 miles in length. The road will be constructed of concrete, eight inches in depth by twenty feet in width. The new pavement will be widened at all curves.
     The cost of the highway improvement will amount to approximately $70,000. The extraordinary expense is due to the heavy grading on the south side of the New York Central Railroad, necessitating the construction of the retaining wall, and to the widening of the pavement at the curves. The work is being done by the Highways Improvement Company of South Bend.

*Photographs accompanying original article not available.


Funds for this information kiosk were provided by the Lincoln Highway Association with assistance from the Indiana Lincoln Highway Association. Special thanks go to Historic New Carlisle, Inc., the Town of New Carlisle, and Susan Jones Graphic Design for their collaboration on the project.
Dedicated 2008
 
Erected 2008.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln Highway marker series.
 
Location.
Lincoln Highway S Curve and Retaining Wall image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
5. Lincoln Highway S Curve and Retaining Wall
Located east of the railroad viaduct
41° 42.373′ N, 86° 30.492′ W. Marker is in New Carlisle, Indiana, in St. Joseph County. Marker can be reached from E. Michigan Street (U.S. 20) east of S. Arch Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is located in front of the New Carlisle Town Hall. Marker is at or near this postal address: 124 E. Michigan Street, New Carlisle IN 46552, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Carlisle Founded (a few steps from this marker); New Carlisle World War II Honor Roll (a few steps from this marker); New Carlisle Civil War Memorial (approx. 0.9 miles away); Hamilton Methodist Church (approx. 2.5 miles away); Hamilton Church Cemetery (approx. 2.5 miles away); Rooted in Studebaker History (approx. 2.6 miles away); Fort Wayne-Fort Dearborn Trail (approx. 5.4 miles away); Rolling Prairie School Honor Roll (approx. 5.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New Carlisle.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Lincoln Highway Association. Official website of the Lincoln Highway Association. (Submitted on August 20, 2014.) 

2. Indiana Lincoln Highway Byway. Official website of the Indiana Lincoln Highway Association. Includes historic photograph of New Carlisle viaduct on front page. (Submitted on August 20, 2014.)
Lincoln Highway in Downtown New Carlisle image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
6. Lincoln Highway in Downtown New Carlisle
View to east
 
 
Categories. Bridges & ViaductsRailroads & StreetcarsRoads & Vehicles
 
Lincoln Highway in New Carlisle image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
7. Lincoln Highway in New Carlisle
View to west from downtown New Carlisle
The Lincoln Highway in the United States image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
8. The Lincoln Highway in the United States
Close-up of map on marker
The Lincoln Highway Through Indiana image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
9. The Lincoln Highway Through Indiana
Close-up of map on marker
Carl Fisher image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
10. Carl Fisher
Close-up of image on marker
Edward Harris image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
11. Edward Harris
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption

Edward Harris, a prominent New Carlisle businessman, served as a Lincoln Highway Consul. The Lincoln Highway Association set up a system of “Consuls” along the route to act as local ambassadors, representing the Highway in local affairs, assisting visitors, and communicating with the Association on matters concerning the Highway.
Photo courtesy of University of Michigan Special Collections Library
Lincoln Highway 1916-1917 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
12. Lincoln Highway 1916-1917
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
A stretch of the Lincoln Highway is paved between South Bend and New Carlisle, 1916-17.
Photo courtesy of Indiana Lincoln Highway Association
Dyer, Indiana image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
13. Dyer, Indiana
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
The town of Dyer, Indiana in Lake County welcomed LH travelers!
Photo courtesy of Russell Rein
Downtown New Carlisle c. 1920 image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
14. Downtown New Carlisle c. 1920
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
The Lincoln Highway in downtown New Carlisle, c. 1920
Photo courtesy of Historic New Carlisle, Inc.
Lincoln Highway in Downtown New Carlisle Today image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
15. Lincoln Highway in Downtown New Carlisle Today
New Carlisle Viaduct image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
16. New Carlisle Viaduct
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
New Carlisle’s solution to the “Death Crossing” was to build a viaduct, considered an engineering marvel at the time. Completed in 1925, the structure greatly improved motoring safety on that stretch of the Lincoln Highway.
Photo courtesy of Historic New Carlisle, Inc.
New Carlisle Viaduct Today image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
17. New Carlisle Viaduct Today
Gresswick Tourist Camp image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
18. Gresswick Tourist Camp
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
Gresswick Tourist Camp was at the intersection of the Lincoln Highway (US 20) and Quince Road in St. Joseph County, east of New Carlisle.
Photo courtesy of Russell Rein
Wykett's Restaurant image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
19. Wykett's Restaurant
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
Wykett’s Restaurant was two miles west of New Carlisle on the Lincoln Highway and served homemade meals and ice cream to hungry motorists.
Photo courtesy of Historic New Carlisle, Inc.
Bob's Barbeque image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
20. Bob's Barbeque
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
A popular restaurant, Bob’s Barbeque was built at the intersection of the Lincoln Highway and State Road 2.
Photo courtesy of Russell Rein
Hudson Lake image. Click for full size.
By Duane Hall, August 8, 2014
21. Hudson Lake
Close-up of image on marker - Image Caption
Many people traveled the Lincoln Highway to Hudson Lake, the popular summer resort north of New Carlisle.
Photo courtesy of Historic New Carlisle, Inc.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page has been viewed 357 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21. submitted on , by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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