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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Site of Silesia School

1902-1925

 
 
Site of Silesia School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. Site of Silesia School Marker
Inscription. In 1902 children from nearby farms traveled by horse and buggy to the Silesia School, a one room school house. The school's contribution of education for this area continued until 1925. In 1959 the school and part of this land was sold to the Congress Heights Baptist Church. That congregation used the school as a mission chapel until 1965 when Fort Washington Baptist Church was built near the Silesia School. The Fort Washington Baptist Church commemorates the site with this plaque in honor and respect to Silesia School, Silesia Maryland.

November 2005
 
Erected 2005.
 
Location. 38° 44.238′ N, 77° 0.161′ W. Marker is in Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is at the intersection of Fort Washington Road and Warburton Road, on the right when traveling east on Fort Washington Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Broad Creek Historic District (approx. 0.4 miles away); Prince Georgeís County - St. Johnís Church (approx. 1.3 miles away); Chapel Hill (approx. 1.4 miles away); “Coach” James W. Crawford
Site of Silesia School Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
2. Site of Silesia School Marker
(approx. 2 miles away); “Warburton Manor” (approx. 2.1 miles away); The Mortar Battery (approx. 2.3 miles away); Fort Washington Park (approx. 2.3 miles away); Battery Decatur and Disappearing Guns (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
Also see . . .  Silesia Schoolhouse. (PDF) P.G. #80-12 Maryland Historical Trust Historic Site Inventory Form, 1988
"The Silesia Schoolhouse was constructed in 1902 on a one-acre lot sold to the Board of County School Commissioners by James and Mary Edelen. It was used as a school for only approximately one quarter century. When the Oxon Hill consolidated school was built in 1925, the one-room schools in the South Potomac/Piscataway area were closed and their students transported to the new school on Livingston Road. The one-acre lot and the Silesia Schoolhouse reverted at this tine to the Edelen family. During the 1930's (according to long-time local residents) the school building was converted into a residence, and it was probably at this time that the east extension was added. In 1959, the schoolhouse and part of the original one-acre
Site of Silesia School image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
3. Site of Silesia School
lot were sold to Congress Heights Baptist Church, which used the building as its mission chapel from that time until 1965. The new church on the adjoining lot was constructed at this time, and came to be known as Fort Washington Baptist Church. Since the mid-1960's the old school building has been used by the church Boy Scout troop, and for occasional church related meetings, but has deteriorated considerably.

The Silesia schoolhouse remains one of very few surviving school buildings from the turn of the century, with a capability of adaptive reuse." -- The building was torn down in the early 21st Century. (Submitted on September 3, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. Education
 
Silesia Schoolhouse image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 12, 2014
4. Silesia Schoolhouse
Close-up of image on marker
Silesia Schoolhouse image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, 1974
5. Silesia Schoolhouse
Mike Dwyer's 1974 photo of the Silesia Schoolhouse appeared in the 1988 Maryland Historical Trust Historic Site Inventory Form.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,081 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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