Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Eudora in Douglas County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

City of Eudora - The Early Years

 
 
City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 2, 2014
1. City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Inscription.

Shawnee Tribal Leader Paschal Fish and his daughter, Eudora
This statue has been created to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the City of Eudora (1857-2007). The statue portrays Shawnee Tribal Leader Paschal Fish and his daughter, Eudora, in the year of 1857.

The May 10, 1854, treaty between the United States government and the United Tribe of Shawnee Indians decreed that the Shawnee cede all the land they previously received (nearly 1,600,000 acres). They were left with approximately 200,000 acres. The Shawnee were to receive 200 acre land allotments per family member. Paschal Fish, as head of his household, received 1,200 acres in land allotments in this part of Douglas County (200 acres for himself, 200 acres for his wife, Martha, and 200 acres for each of his children: Obediah, Eudora, Leander, and Mary Ann). The Shawnee Indian Territory lay south of the Kansas River and from the Missouri River approximately 30 miles west.

Paschal Fish, and his brother, Charles, owned and operated a ferry, which crossed the Kansas River just north of downtown Eudora. The ferry was frequently used by the U.S. Army from Fort Leavenworth. Paschal also owned and operated the Fish Hotel, a wooden structure with the first floor used for dining and the second floor for sleeping quarters. It was located along the
City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., August 2, 2014
2. City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Westport and Freemont Trails (near the current location of 17th and Oak). These trails connected Kansas City to Lawrence and tied into the Oregon, California, and Santa Fe Trails. Travelers often stayed at the Fish Hotel and were provided food and shelter. On May 1, 1855, the Kansas Territorial Governor, Andrew H. Reeder, stayed at the Fish Hotel. The Governor's horse was hidden, so it would not be seen by pro-slavery supporters. Paschal was a Methodist minister and was instrumental in establishing the Wakarusa Indian Mission built in Eudora, 1848-1850.

Paschal Fish (1805-1893). In about 1870, Paschal Fish moved from Eudora to Indian Territory near Miami, Oklahoma. On February 2, 1893, Paschal was found frozen to death along Tar Creek close to his home near the Kansas - Oklahoma border.

Eudora Fish (ca. 1848-1877). May 2, 1868, Eudora Fish married Dallas Emmons. They lived in LaCygne, Kansas, and had 4 children: Theodore, Bert, Hettie, and Adeliah. Eudora passed away unexpectedly at the age of 29. She is buried in the Huron Indian Cemetery in downtown, Kansas City, Kansas.

January 24, 1861
The Lawrence Republican
Editors: John Speer and Verres Nicholas Smith

Amongst the wide-awake, lively towns of Kansas, is the town of Eudora. Its location was first made about four years ago by an enterprising company of Germans, principally
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
3. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
from Chicago. From its first selection as a town-site it has manifested the energetic character of the independent German, who looks all obstacles in the face, and it was but a short time till Eudora became a village, not on paper, but to be sought as a residence. Not behind their American neighbors even in education, they built a town house, and established schools. We remember passing through it shortly after its selection, when the hammer and the saw was to be heard in every quarter, and to our inquiries in regard to its prospects, an honest old German responded, "Wait awhile, and we will show you what Free Labor can do," and they have fulfilled this prophecy. Eudora is now a village with all the evidences of thrift, taste and good society. It is not now, though it was at first, an exclusively German place, nearly one-half of its population now being from different portions of the Union. We are informed that its population is about two hundred.

By the individual contributions of its people and their labor, they have built a bridge across the Wakarusa, which is perhaps not excelled by any other structure of the kind in Kansas. Its location is at the intersection of that stream with the Kansas River, and is one of the most picturesque and healthy locations in Kansas. They have a steam saw and grist mill, a lath machine and a shingle machine, besides the usual number of
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
4. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
stores and mechanics' shops, such as wagon makers, blacksmiths, etc. They have some of the best dwellings in Kansas, and are now erecting some substantial buildings, among which we notice a fine store and dwelling, by Mr. Paschal Fish, an enterprising, intelligent Shawnee Indian. They are a reading people, we know, for without any exertions on our part, they now take about thirty copies of the REPUBLICAN. A few days ago, they held a meeting, and set apart one hundred and twenty lots, to be given to persons who will erect buildings - evincing a liberality which always has its sure reward.

(Source: National Archives, Kansas City, MO)
Note of interest: John Speer (1817-1906) was a member of the Territorial Legislature and abolitionist newspaper editor. Two of Speer's teenage sons died in Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, August 21, 1863.


German Settlement Society
In 1854, German emigrants in Chicago formed a settlement stockholders' company known by various names, including: "Deutsche Ansiedlungs Verein" (German Settlement Society) and "Neuer Ansiedlungsverein" (New Settlement Association). After visiting the rolling prairie land located just south of the confluence of the Wakarusa and Kansas Rivers, which was owned by Paschal Fish, the German settlers decided this was where they wanted to settle. In 1857, agents Charles C. Durr and Louis
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
5. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
W. Pfief, acting on behalf of the German Settlement Society, purchased 774½ acres of land for $10,000 from Paschal Fish.

The German settlers honored the request of Paschal Fish and named their new town after his daughter, Eudora.

[Photo captions, from left, read]
Eudora Fish, daughter of Paschal Fish, namesake of Eudora, Kansas. (ca. 1848-1877) Eudora is buried in the Huron Indian Cemetery in downtown, Kansas City, Kansas.
————————
Leander Jackson, 'Jack' Fish (1852-1914), son of Paschal Fish, buried in GAR Cemetery in Miami, Oklahoma. Leander Island was an island in the Kansas River named after Leander. The island is visible on an 1873 map of Eudora.
————————
Artist's conception of the Wakarusa Indian Mission by Robert May. The Wakarusa Indian Mission was located near 12th and Elm.
————————
The Eudora Depot was built in 1871, closed in 1967, and destroyed by fire in 1990.
————————
Harry Hagenbuch built the foot-bridge that crossed the Wakarusa River, 1906-1908. A fee was charged to cross the bridge.
————————
Copy of the deed passing title from Paschal Fish to
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, March 24, 1910
6. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Louis W. Pfeif and Charles C. Durr, agents for the German Settlement Society. The original deed is at Watkins Community Museum of History in Lawrence.
————————
Charles Durr, agent for the German Settlement Society, who with Louis Pfief [sic - Pfeif], signed the deed buying 774 ½ acres of land from Paschal Fish. He operated Eudora's first saw mill and the Eudora Flour Mill.
————————
Charles Lothholz, a member of the German Settlement Society opened the lumberyard in 1868 and organized the Kaw Valley Bank in 1899. Through his efforts the first bridge across the Kansas River at Eudora was built in 1888.
————————
Charles Pilla came to Eudora in 1865 and bought an interest in the Pilla Department Store from his brother, Fred Pilla. He continued the business until his death in 1916 at the age of 86.
————————
The Charles Pilla house, located at 615 Elm, was built in 1894. It had a modern water system with water pumped into a large tank in the attic to furnish water for a flush toilet and a bathtub. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Homes [sic - Places].
————————
Eudora's first bell
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1908
7. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
was used in the first school near 7th and Main in 1860. It is currently displayed in front of the Eudora City Hall, near the location of the first school.
————————
Charles Pilla's large general store was located on the southwest corner of 7th and Main. He sold items ranging from groceries to shoes, and farm implements to Mitchell automobiles.
————————
Jim Brothers, renowned sculptor, Lawrence, Kansas. Paschal and Eudora Fish statue dedicated, October 6, 2007
————————
The Eudora School was opened in the fall of 1860 on a lot donated to the City of Eudora by Paschal Fish. This school was converted to the City Hall in 1866 when a larger school was built near 7th and Church. The structure has been moved to the 700 block of Maple and converted to a private residence.
 
Erected by the Shawnee Tribe, City of Eudora, and Lions, International.
 
Location. 38° 56.621′ N, 95° 5.948′ W. Marker is in Eudora, Kansas, in Douglas County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and 9th Street, on the left when traveling north on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Pilla Park, Eudora KS 66025, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, circa 1860
8. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Shawnee Tribal Leader Paschal Fish and his Daughter, Eudora (here, next to this marker); 806 Main Street (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 800 Main Street (about 500 feet away); 736 Main Street (about 600 feet away); 726 Main Street (about 800 feet away); 719 Main Street (about 800 feet away); 724 Main Street (about 800 feet away); 715 Main Street (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Eudora.
 
Also see . . .  History of Eudora, Kansas. (Submitted on August 23, 2014, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
9. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
10. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
11. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
12. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
13. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
14. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
15. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, undated
16. Image on City of Eudora - The Early Years Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 203 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement