Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Oglethorpe in Catoosa County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Historic Plaques and Markers

 
 
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
1. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
Inscription.
Battlefield plaques
document troop positions and
movements

On August 19, 1890, the U.S. Congress established the Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park for the purpose of "preserving and suitably marking for historical and professional military study the fields of some of the most remarkable maneuvers and most brilliant fighting in the war of the rebellion...."

The three park commissioners, all veterans of Chickamauga or Chattanooga, placed hundreds of cast-iron plaques and other markers on the battlefields in the early 1890s. Each plaque identifies the location of a particular army, corps, division, brigade, or artillery battery at a specific time. The plaques also describe military actions.

Hundreds of veterans contributed information for the plaques, and retraced their steps to determine the exact locations of their units. Today the plaques remain valuable tools for those who seek to understand in detail how these complex battles were fought.

Types of Plaques:
Today you will find several types of historic plaques and markers on the Chickamauga and Chattanooga battlefields.
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Blue plaques mark the positions of Union
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
2. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
Featured marker is the panel marker on the left.
units.
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Red plaques mark the positions of Confederate units.
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Cannon mark the positions of artillery batteries.
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Fingerboards indicate directions, locations, or landmarks.
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Large cannonball pyramids stacked 15-high mark the spots where brigade commanders were killed.
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Small cannonball pyramids stacked 7-high mark headquarters sites.
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Authorized Strengths of
Infantry Units

To understand the information on the plaques and monuments, it helps to know troops were organized. This chart shows theoretically how many men were in each unit; however, most units here went into battle at half-strength or less.

Units were identified by numbers, states, or the names of commanders. For example, "35th Ohio Regiment" or "Longstreet's Corps."
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Company
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
3. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
A close-up view of the "type of plaques" section of the marker that displays examples of the different types of plaques.
101 men, commanded by a Captain.
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Regiment 10 companies, 1,046 men, commanded by a Colonel.
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Brigade 2 or more Regiments, 2,100 men, commanded by a Brigadier General.
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Division 2 or more Brigades, 6,000 men, commanded by a Major General.
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Corps 2 or more Divisions, 18,000 men, commanded by a Major General.
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Selected Terms Used on Plaques

Battery, A grouping of cannon, usually four or six.
Casualties, Soldiers wounded, killed, or missing in action. Those captured are sometimes included.
Enfilade, To fire at an enemy line from an angle rather than from the front. This type of fire was especially deadly.
Flank, The right or left end of a line of troops.
Oblique, A direction diagonal to the line of battle.
Skirmish, A fight between small numbers of troops. A minor or preliminary engagement.
Vedettes,
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
4. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
A close-up view of the "Infantry Units" section of the marker that displays examples of the different types of infantry units and their troop strength.
Sentries or pickets posted to report on enemy movements.
 
Erected by Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park.
 
Location. 34° 56.416′ N, 85° 15.588′ W. Marker is near Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, in Catoosa County. Marker can be reached from Lafayette Road south of Post Road. Click for map. This historical marker is located in the national park that preserves the site of the Chickamauga Battlefield, along the western side of the LaFayette Road. This particular historical marker is situated very near the northern Lafayette Road entrance to the National Park, at the Visitor Center, being situated just to the right of the Visitor Center's parking lot entrance doorway. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Oglethorpe GA 30742, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Battlefield Monuments (here, next to this marker); Field Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battle of Chickamauga (within shouting distance of this marker); Turchin's Brigade. (within shouting distance of this marker); 88th Indiana Regiment
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
5. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
View of the historical marker, looking east, along the Visitor Center's walkway.
(about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bridges' Illinois Battery (approx. 0.3 miles away); a different marker also named Bridges' Illinois Battery (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Oglethorpe.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Historic Plaques and Markers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
6. Historic Plaques and Markers Marker
View of he historical marker looking west, towards the parking lot side main entrance to the park's Visitor Center.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 258 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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