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Jerusalem Mills in Harford County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Harry Gilmor's Raid

“Great excitement in... Harford County,” July 11, 1864

 
 
Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 17, 2011
1. Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker
Inscription. What caused the “great excitement” in Harford County during the summer of 1864? It was the arrival of a detachment of the Confederate cavalrymen led by partisan Major Harry Gilmor. He and his trooper, mostly Marylanders, were part of a 12,000-man force under General Jubal A. Early that entered their home state from Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley earlier in July. Their purpose was to threaten the lightly defended city of Washington, D.C., in an attempt to draw off part of the Union army menacing Richmond and Petersburg, Va.

After brushing aside an inferior Federal force at the Battle of Monocacy, near Frederick, Maryland, Early detached his cavalry under General Bradley T. Johnson to ride around Washington’s eastern defenses and liberate Confederate prisoners at Point Lookout in Southern Maryland. Johnson then detached Gilmor to pass north and east of Baltimore and sever communications with the North. As Gilmor and his men rode, they burned houses and bridges, seized supplies, and on July 11, captured Union Gen. William B. Franklin, who escaped the next day. Arriving here at the village of Jerusalem Mill, they “requisitioned” from David Lee’s (now McCourtney’s) Store “boots, shoes, and other wearing apparel.” They also seized Lee’s horses. The Confederates then departed, soon rejoining the main
Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 17, 2011
2. Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker
body and returning to Virginia. Early’s 1864 Maryland campaign failed to breach the capital’s defenses or free prisoners, but it did lure substantial numbers of Federal troops away from Richmond and Petersburg to strengthen the Washington garrison.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 39° 27.786′ N, 76° 23.328′ W. Marker is in Jerusalem Mills, Maryland, in Harford County. Marker is on Jerusalem Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Kingsville MD 21087, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jerusalem Mills (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Harry Gilmor’s Raid (approx. one mile away); Franklinville (approx. one mile away); “Olney” (approx. 1.3 miles away); Saint John’s Parish (approx. 1.8 miles away); Ishmael Day’s House (approx. 2 miles away); The Sweathouse Road (approx. 3.1 miles away); Fork United Methodist Church (approx. 3.2 miles away).
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, July 17, 2011
3. Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker
McCourtney's Store-Now a museum
Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, June 28, 2011
4. Harry Gilmore' Raid Marker
Harry Gilmore's grave marker Louden Park Cemetery, Baltimore MD Confederate Hill Section
Confederate cavalry raid on New Windsor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
5. Confederate cavalry raid on New Windsor
Close-up of image on marker
Major Harry Gilmor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
6. Major Harry Gilmor
Close-up of photo on marker
Members of Gilmor's command image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 27, 2014
7. Members of Gilmor's command
Close-up of photo on marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 741 times since then and 42 times this year. Last updated on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234.   5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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