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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Montgomery in Orange County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

32-Pounder

 
 
32-Pounder Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
1. 32-Pounder Marker
Inscription. The modern cannon beside you is an accurate reproduction of a ca. 1760-1780 English 32-pounder cannon. The term “32-pounder” refers to the weight of the cannonball, not the cannon itself, which weighs nearly 6,000 pounds. The casting for this reproduction cannon barrel is based on an original English 32-pounder on display at New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site. The carriage is based on drawings of English carriages typical of the period.

It is not known where the Americans obtained Fort Montgomeryís six 32-pounders. The guns were brought to the fort by water and the hauled up to the Grand Battery by oxen and struggling soldiers. The fate of the 32-pounders after the battle is also uncertain, although documents suggest that the British may have taken them away by ship before destroying the fort.
 
Erected by Fort Montgomery State Historic Site, Heritage New York, and the Peter Jay Sharp Foundation.
 
Location. 41° 19.436′ N, 73° 59.166′ W. Marker is in Fort Montgomery, New York, in Orange County. Click for map. Marker is in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site on the walking trail, overlooking the Hudson River. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Montgomery NY 10922, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Marker in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
2. Marker in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site
This 32-pounder cannon is one of several guns located at the Grand Battery in Fort Montgomery State Historic Site.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Naval Battle of Fort Montgomery (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Naval Battle of Fort Montgomery (here, next to this marker); Grand Battery (a few steps from this marker); Three Sisters Garden (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gardens of the Fort (about 300 feet away); Powder Magazine (about 300 feet away); The Battle of Fort Montgomery (about 400 feet away); Building a Fort (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Montgomery.
 
More about this marker. The top of the marker features a “Drawing of the basic elements of an 18th-century English cannon.” These include the Cascable, Vent, First Reinforce, Second Reinforce, Chase, Muzzle and Trunnions.

The bottom portion of the marker contains a picture of two American soldiers, holding a Worm and a Sponge, with a cannon between them. Surrounding this picture are illustrations of the various equipment needed to use the gun. Among these are a Rammer “to force the charge down the gunís barrel”, Sponge “to extinguish burning embers before loading the next charge”, Worm “for extracting lodged matter from the gun”, Spike “for jamming in the vent to render the gun useless if captured by the enemy”, Water
Grand Battery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 23, 2008
3. Grand Battery
The Grand Battery, where the marker is located, is one of the stops on the walking trail at Fort Montgomery State Historic Site. Other stops include the remains of earthworks and fort buildings.
Bucker “holds water for sponge”, Linstock Wrapped with Match “for lighting a portfire or directly lighting the charge”, “Portfire & Portfire Stock “a torch held in a wooden handle for lighting the charge” and “Tompion “to keep debris out of the gunís muzzle”. The Cannon detail is from a painting by Dahl Taylor, 2002.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This series of markers follow the walking tour of the Fort Montgomery Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Fort's Montgomery and Clinton. The American Revolutionary War. (Submitted on May 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. The Battle of Fort's Montgomery and Clinton. (Submitted on May 8, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryWar, US Revolutionary
 
Marker at Fort Montgomrty's Grand Battery. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 10, 2015
4. Marker at Fort Montgomrty's Grand Battery.
Artillerymen from Motts Artillery march past the 32-Pounder and marker on the Grand Battery at Fort Montgomery.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,292 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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