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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Nick of Time

 
 
Nick of Time Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 9, 2014
1. Nick of Time Marker
The background of the marker is a photo captioned, "Monocacy Junction (shown here in 1858) was strategic, if destroyed would cut off Union supplies and reinforcements to the west." A small illustration in the upper right is captioned, "This Harpers Weekly sketch of the Confederate-destroyed bridge over the Monocacy River illustrates the havoc wrought by armies upon the railroad."
Inscription. On July 9, 1864, at 2:00 a.m., the last train of Union reinforcements pulled into Monocacy Junction just hours before the battle. The addition of 3,400 veterans increased Wallace's total to 6,600 men. While Wallace was successful in delaying the Confederate march on Washington, he failed to stop the Confederates from destroying the junction and damaging the railroad bridge.

Railroads played a major part in the Civil War. The ability to move troops and supplies rapidly over short and long distances had an immediate effect on campaigns and battles. Because of this advantage, railroads would become prime targets for both armies throughout the war.

A large force of veterans have arrived by water, and will be sent immediately [by train]. John W. Garrett, B&O Railroad President
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 39° 22.302′ N, 77° 23.483′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located on the battlefield trail paralleling the railroad track, from the Monocacy park visitor center. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Nick of Time Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
2. Nick of Time Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Slave to Soldier (here, next to this marker); Commemoration (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment (about 500 feet away); Desperate Escape (approx. 0.2 miles away); Burning of the Bridge (approx. mile away); Monocacy National Battlefield (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Monocacy National Battlefield (approx. 0.4 miles away); Gambrill Mill (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Frederick.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of Monocacy by Markers. (Submitted on August 31, 2014, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Monocacy Junction 1858 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
3. Monocacy Junction 1858
Monocacy Junction (shown here in 1858) was strategic; if destroyed it would cut off Union supplies and reinforcements to the west.
Close-up of photo on marker
Monocacy Junction image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 9, 2014
4. Monocacy Junction
This photo of the junction, a triangle intersection of the railroad, was taken 150 years to the day after the battle.
Remains of the Monocacy Railroad Bridge - September 1862 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
5. Remains of the Monocacy Railroad Bridge - September 1862
The War in Maryland — remains of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad bridge over the Monocacy, Destroyed by the Rebels. — From a sketch by our special artist.

This Harpers Weekly sketch of the Confederate-destroyed bridge over the Monocacy River illustrates the havoc wrought by armies upon the railroad.
Close-up of image on marker
Frederick Jct.<br>STA# 38 + 65<br>M.P. BAX - 0.17 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 2, 2014
6. Frederick Jct.
STA# 38 + 65
M.P. BAX - 0.17
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 382 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2, 3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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