“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Bern in Craven County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)

Attmore-Oliver House

Under the Stars & Bars

Attmore-Oliver House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2014
1. Attmore-Oliver House Marker
Like many other North Carolinians, New Bernís residents enjoyed close economic and family ties with the North and were reluctant to leave the Union. Once the war began, however, many North Carolinians passionately supported the Confederate cause: 125,000 bore arms for the Confederacy and 40,000 died. No other Southern state provided as many fighting men or suffered as many deaths.

The men who lived here in the Attmore-Oliver House, which Hannah Attmore Oliver inherited just before the war, joined other residents under the “Stars and Bars.” William Oliver, Hannahís husband, served as a Confederate quartermaster. Her three brothers also enlisted in the Confederate army. The oldest, Sitgreaves, of the Washington Grays, was captured with his battery at the Battle of Fort Fisher in 1865, and died of chronic dysentery on May 22. Isaac Attmore, of the Beaufort Rifles, fought in many major battles, including Gettysburg, and was killed at Spotsylvania Court House on May 12, 1864. George, the youngest at 13 when the war began, served in Manlyís Battery at Gettysburg, Spotsylvania Court House, The Wilderness, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. He was at Appomattox Court House when Gen. Robert E. Lee capitulated, but his company left for North Carolina without surrendering. Attmore was pardoned at Greensboro on May 9, 1865,
Attmore-Oliver House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2014
2. Attmore-Oliver House Marker
and returned to New Bern.

The New Bern Historical Societyís Attmore-Oliver House Museum contains a collection of Civil War artifacts assembled by the local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. For many years, one of Hannah Oliverís daughters, Mary Oliver, was chapter president.

(lower left) Cavalryman; Artillery Officer; Infantryman
(upper right) Attmore-Oliver House Museum - Courtesy New Bern Historical Society
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
Location. 35° 6.429′ N, 77° 2.551′ W. Marker is in New Bern, North Carolina, in Craven County. Marker is on Pollock Street east of Metcalf Street, on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 510 Pollock Street, New Bern NC 28562, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. George H. White (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); John Wright Stanly House (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named John Wright Stanly House (about 600 feet away); Washington's Southern Tour
Attmore-Oliver House image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 14, 2014
3. Attmore-Oliver House
Sign on the far right-New Bern Historical Society & New Bern Preservation Foundation-Straight ahead
(about 700 feet away); James Walker Hood (about 700 feet away); Tryon Palace (about 700 feet away); Jones House (about 700 feet away); Caleb Bradham (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in New Bern.
Categories. War, US Civil
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 230 times since then and 78 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photo of Attmore-Oliver house. • Can you help?
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