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Old Bennington in Bennington County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Henry Covered Bridge

across the Walloomsac River

 
 
Henry Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 5, 2014
1. Henry Covered Bridge Marker
Inscription. This quiet spot was once a major river crossing. Traffic between southwestern Vermont and New York State crossed here, until the railroad was built in 1852, troops marched from Manchester, Vermont to the Battle of Bennington in 1777, and teams and stages transported freight and passenger. The original Henry Covered Bridge was built c. 1840. In the 1860s and ‘70s, heavy wagon loads of iron ore were hauled over the bridge from the Burden Iron Company mine on Orebed Road to its washing works on Paran Creek in North Bennington. A succession of water-powered mills was located next to the bridge on the south side. The last was a grist mill operated into the 1920s by Bertine T. Henry, one of this area’s many descendants of the Irish-born William Henry (1734-1811).

This bridge is supported by Town lattice trusses. The design, patented in 1820 by Connecticut architect Ithiel Town, represented a great technological leap forward from the earlier heavy timber king post, queen post, and Burr truss styles. Carpenters with saw and and drills could assemble a lighter, stronger, web-like truss from mill-sawn planks with wooden trunnels (pegs). Bridges were covered to protect the structural skeleton from moisture, helping to preserve the bridge.

This bridge, built in 1989 by the State of Vermont, Agency of Transportation, is a replica
Henry Covered Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 5, 2014
2. Henry Covered Bridge Marker
replacing the deteriorating original bridge built c. 1840.

Two other covered bridges, the Paper Mill Village Covered Bridge and the Silk Road Covered Bridge, cross the Walloomsac River within two
 
Location. 42° 54.74′ N, 73° 15.29′ W. Marker is in Old Bennington, Vermont, in Bennington County. Marker is on Murphy Road near Ore Bed Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1037 Murphy Road, Bennington VT 05201, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Birthplace of Vermont (approx. 0.3 miles away); Park-McCullough House (approx. 1.3 miles away); Home Where Lt .Colonel Baum Died (approx. 1.9 miles away); Continental Storehouse Site (approx. 2.5 miles away); Battle of Bennington (approx. 2.5 miles away); New Hampshire at the Battle of Bennington (approx. 2.5 miles away); Anthony Haswell (approx. 2.6 miles away); Colonel Seth Warner (approx. 2.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Old Bennington.
 
More about this marker. This marker is at the south end of the covered bridge.
 
Also see . . .
1. Vermont Covered Bridges List. (Submitted on September 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.)
Silk Road Covered Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 5, 2014
3. Silk Road Covered Bridge

2. Covered Bridge - Wikipedia. A covered bridge is a timber-truss bridge with a roof and siding which, in most covered bridges, create an almost complete enclosure. The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather. Uncovered wooden bridges have a life span of only 10 to 15 years because of the effects of rain and sun. (Submitted on September 12, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Bridges & Viaducts
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 260 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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