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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cloverdale in Sonoma County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Gould--Shaw House

 
 
Gould--Shaw House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Loren Wilson, September 13, 2014
1. Gould--Shaw House Marker
Inscription. Gould-Shaw House Thomas Jefferson Gould, an Indiana born blacksmith, built this house, which has become an important part of the town’s history, in 1862. One of the few surviving examples of Gothic Revival architecture, the house is the oldest documented dwelling in Cloverdale. Isaac Ellis Shaw bought the house from Gould in 1875 and lived there with his wife and two children. Following his wife’s death Shaw remarried, moved his new wife Minerva, into the house and had another two children. Shaw died in 1905 and his wife lived here until her death in 1938. The house was purchased by the Cloverdale Historical Society in 1983 and underwent major renovations and retrofitting in the late 1990’s.
 
Erected 2014 by Sam Brannan #1004 and Yerba Buena #1, E Clampus Vitus.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 38° 48.405′ N, 123° 1.107′ W. Marker is in Cloverdale, California, in Sonoma County. Marker can be reached from North Cloverdale Boulevard. Click for map. The Plaque is located on an east wall of the Cloverdale History Center, adjacent to the Gould-Shaw House. Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 North Cloverdale Boulevard, Cloverdale CA 95425, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Gould--Shaw House image. Click for full size.
By Loren Wilson, September 13, 2014
2. Gould--Shaw House
At least 1 other marker is within 16 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Harmon Gregg Heald (approx. 15.7 miles away).
 
Regarding Gould--Shaw House. When Indiana-born blacksmith Thomas Jefferson Gould built his house on Cloverdale’s West Street in 1862, he had no way of knowing it would one day be known as the Gould Shaw House, much less that it would become such a significant part of the town’s history. Located at 215 Cloverdale boulevard, the house is the oldest documented dwelling in Cloverdale and one of the rare surviving examples of the Gothic Revival architecture. This is an architectural style of the Victorian era that is characterized by steeply pitched roofs, pointed-arch windows, elaborate trim along the roof edges, and high dormers.

Isaac Ellis Shaw bought the house from Gould in 1875, He lived there with his wife Louisa and their two children, Charles and Ella, until Louisa’s untimely death in 1878. Shaw remarried the following year and moved his new wife, Minerva, into the house. They eventually had two children of their own, Frank and Gertrude. Shaw died in 1905 and Minerva continued to live there until her death in 1938.

The year his first wife died, Shaw had formed a business partnership with John Bowman. They built a large brick building on the northwest corner of West Street at Second Street where they operated
This picture was taken in 1900. Members of the Shaw family can be seen standing on the front porch. image. Click for full size.
1900
3. This picture was taken in 1900. Members of the Shaw family can be seen standing on the front porch.
Photo courtesy of the Cloverdale Historical Society
a mercantile store known as the Shaw Bowman Company. The building changed hands several times over the years, with the last owners being Ray and Bernice Donnelly, who operated Donnelly Department Store until 1971. The building was razed in 1975 to make room for a parking lot, which is still what it is today.

In the early 1880’s, banking activities were conducted out of the Shaw Bowman Building. A bank charter was officially obtained by Shaw and six other merchants on February 25, 1884. First called the Cloverdale Exchange Bank, and later the Bank of Cloverdale, Shaw was the first president. After Minerva’s death, the house had several owners before the Cloverdale Historical Society purchased it in 1883 with the idea of turning it into the Cloverdale Museum. The structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1992 and underwent a major renovation and earthquake retrofitting in the late 1990’s.

On Saturday, July 21, 2012, the citizens of Cloverdale were invited to attend a celebration of the 150th anniversary of the Gould-Shaw House. An old fashioned ice cream social was held on the garden patio accompanied by birthday cake and balloons. Tours of the new History Center were a feature of the afternoon.

By Mary Jo Winter,
Cloverdale Historical Society
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Gould--Shaw House image. Click for full size.
circa Unknown
4. Gould--Shaw House
Photo courtesy of the Cloverdale Historical Society
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California. This page has been viewed 199 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Loren Wilson of Sebastopol, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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