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Red House in Cattaraugus County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Ski Jumping

at Allegany State Park

 
 
Ski Jumping Marker image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 15, 2012
1. Ski Jumping Marker
Inscription. This is the site of Allegany State Park's 30-meter and 50-meter ski jumps. The two jumps and the park's ski slopes at Bova were Depression-era projects constructed by the Civilian Conservation Corps and New York State's Temporary Emergency Relief Administration. The park's ski facilities were the first in western New York and paved the way for the development of the area's privately operated resorts. Art Roscoe Sr., park forester, and former Olympic skier, Karl Fahrner, were responsible for the construction of the jumps.

Allegany State Park's ski jumps had an international reputation. Made of all natural materials, they were rated among the best in the country. The first jumping meet, sponsored by the Buffalo Ski Club, was held February 24, 1935. An estimated 5,000 spectators attended. Annual tournaments featured cross-country and downhill races, slalom competitions, and jumping meets. Many participants and spectators traveled to Salamanca by train and then by bus from the railway to the park, filling accommodations to overflowing. The last meet was held February 3, 1979.

This map [see photo - submitter], produced by the Inter-State Ski Club shows the ski trails and facilities within Allegany State Park in 1937. The ski club was formed on March 6, 1936, and hosted annual tournaments until 1971. Club members came from
Ski Jumping Marker as seen from S. Mountain Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 15, 2012
2. Ski Jumping Marker as seen from S. Mountain Rd.
19 different organizations in Pennsylvania, Ohio, New Jersey, and Ontario, Canada as well as New York State.

Records
50-meter jump 188 feet Set in 1956 by professional Austrian skier, Franz Elsigan.
50-meter jump (amateur) 163 feet Set in 1940 by Paul Ricci, a Niagara University Student.
30-meter jump 108 feet Set in 1948 by George Boyer, Jr. of Red House, New York.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 42° 6.326′ N, 78° 45.052′ W. Marker is in Red House, New York, in Cattaraugus County. Marker is on South Mountain Road 0.3 miles from Allegany State Park Route 1, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. S. Mountain Rd is marked "do not enter" at the intersection with ASP 1. You can ignore that for at least as far as the marker. The "do not enter" refers to a maintenance area farther down the road. The marker is along the paved pedestrian/bike that circles Red House Lake. This portion of the path is behind the white dam/bridge that creates the lake. Marker is in this post office area: Salamanca NY 14779, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Civilian Conservation Corps (approx. 0.3 miles away); Weather Station
Ski Jumping Marker as seen facing S. Mountain Rd. image. Click for full size.
By Yugoboy, August 15, 2012
3. Ski Jumping Marker as seen facing S. Mountain Rd.
(approx. 0.3 miles away); Outdoor Museum (approx. 0.3 miles away); Stoddard Hollow (approx. 1.1 miles away); Fire Observation Stations: / Fire Tower is Reborn (approx. 2.9 miles away); Sweet Water Spring (approx. 3 miles away); From the Mountains of Afghanistan (approx. 3.7 miles away); Dedicated to Those from the Salamanca Area (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Red House.
 
More about this marker. Given the topography of the area, I'm assuming the marker is placed at about the landing point for the ski jumpers.
 
Regarding Ski Jumping. A motor vehicle entrance fee is typically required during business hours in season and on weekends.
 
Also see . . .  Allegany State Park - New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. Red House Area. The Park generally has two areas; Red House (north) and Quaker (south). (Submitted on September 28, 2014, by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York.) 
 
Additional keywords.
Red Jacket Trailhead to Ski Jumps Site image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
4. Red Jacket Trailhead to Ski Jumps Site
A mile loop trail to the ski jumps site is behind the Administration Building.
Red Jacket Hiking Trail
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkSports
 
30-meter Ski Jumping View image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
5. 30-meter Ski Jumping View
The 30-meter site is arrived at first if one takes the lower (right) loop of the trail. The marker can be seen in the distance.
Ski Jumping Observation Raised Platform image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
6. Ski Jumping Observation Raised Platform
These skeletal ruins are between the jumps. Keep off!
50-meter Ski Jump Site image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
7. 50-meter Ski Jump Site
Trail steps to the 50-meter jump site.
50-meter Ski Jump Site image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
8. 50-meter Ski Jump Site
Pay attention! The trail turns left here, up and across the higher jump site. This is the farthest point of the trail. A false trail leads straight ahead and past this jump site! There is a metal signpost here (behind me) for the hairpin turn, but the post only had part of a regular sheet of paper hanging from it when I visited. Note the boys in the background on the trail, having made the turn at this point.
View from 50-meter Ski Jump site image. Click for full size.
By Anton Schwarzmueller, September 26, 2014
9. View from 50-meter Ski Jump site
The bridge at the bottom of the jumps over Red House Brook was washed out by a flash flood in the 1990s, I believe. The present bridge for the pedestrian/bike trail is some yards downstream, to the left, and is not aligned with the old ski jumps. The abutments for the present bridge are more substantial.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York. This page has been viewed 506 times since then and 23 times this year. Last updated on , by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Yugoboy of Rochester, New York.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Anton Schwarzmueller of Wilson, New York. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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