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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Orleans in Barnstable County, Massachusetts — The American Northeast (New England)
 

French–Atlantic Cable Company

 
 
French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
1. French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker
Inscription. French – Atlantic cable company Cape Cod station 1890 – 1959. Oldest cable on Atlantic bed. From storm isolated Cape, first world news of steamer Portland lost off Truro with 200 lives; flashed from Orleans to Brest, France and back over their other cable to New York, November 28, 1898. Closed in 1959 for automation.
 
Erected by 1976 by American Revolution Bicentennial.
 
Location. 41° 47.281′ N, 69° 59.27′ W. Marker is in Orleans, Massachusetts, in Barnstable County. Marker is on S Orleans Rd, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 41 S Orleans Rd, Orleans MA 02653, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jonathan Young Mill (approx. half a mile away); Battle of Orleans Massachusetts 1814 (approx. 1.3 miles away); First Encounter Plaque (approx. 2.4 miles away); First Encounter Monument (approx. 2.5 miles away); Eastham Windmill (approx. 3 miles away); Kettles (approx. 3.5 miles away); Workboat of the Marshes (approx. 3.5 miles away); Three Sisters Lit the Way (approx. 5.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Orleans.
 
Regarding French–Atlantic Cable Company.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
2. French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker
The museum is open for tours. Check the museum's web site for their schedule. During WW II (1940 to 1952) after the fall of France to Germany the station was closed for security reasons.
 
Also see . . .
1. French Cable Station Museum. (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
2. French Cable Station. (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
3. Wheatstone bridge. (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
4. The Heurtley Magnifier. (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
5. Portland (shipwreck). (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
6. Brest, France. (Submitted on September 29, 2014, by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia.)
 
Categories. CommunicationsIndustry & Commerce
 
French–Atlantic Cable Company Museum image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
3. French–Atlantic Cable Company Museum
French–Atlantic Cable Company Museum Sign image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
4. French–Atlantic Cable Company Museum Sign
French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
5. French–Atlantic Cable Company Marker
French–Atlantic Cable Company Testing Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
6. French–Atlantic Cable Company Testing Room
This room contains equipment that was used to determine the location of a fault or break in the cable. Some of the equipment is still operational and can be demonstrated. The device in the center (above the ruler) of the table is a Wheatstone bridge used to calculate the distance to where the undersea cable was broken.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Testing Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
7. French–Atlantic Cable Company Testing Room
Heurtley Magnifier used to amplify the weak signal coming from France. There are only three in existence in the world today.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
8. French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room
This is the room that held the equipment used to repair the cable and equipment. There are samples of the early submarine telegraph cable and cables that have been under the sea for decades displayed in this room.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
9. French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room
A piece of the original 1858 Transatlantic Cable donated to the museum by Elizabeth Dyer Haskell.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
10. French–Atlantic Cable Company Repair Room
Samples of submarine telegraph cable.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
11. French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room
This was where the messages from France were received, recorded, and retransmitted to rest of the country. Most of the equipment still functions and can be demonstrated.
French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
12. French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room
French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room image. Click for full size.
By Byron Hooks, September 5, 2014
13. French–Atlantic Cable Company Operations Room
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 313 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Byron Hooks of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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