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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Reno in Washoe County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Reno's Beginning

Lake's Crossing and the Riverside Hotel

 
 
Reno's Beginning Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
1. Reno's Beginning Marker
Inscription. A Missouri mulepacker, William C. Fuller failed to strike it rich in California’s gold fields. His trek home, around 1859 or 1860, included a stop in the marshy valley known as the Truckee Meadows, located north of the Comstock Mining District, it was obvious that the pioneer trail to the Sierra Nevada was going to get busy.

Fuller found the highest piece of ground along the Truckee and built a log bridge near this site. He charged a small toil for crossing. He also built a log shelter that was popular among the tired and dusty prospectors. A spring flood washed away the bridge in 1861. He rebuilt the bridge, but Fuller was looking for a way out of the toll business.

Myron C. Lake, was another disillusioned miner who decided ranching might be the real Mother Lode of the West. He settled on a ranch near Honey Lake north of the Truckee Meadows, but barely made a living. Lake saw much more than just a way to cross the river on Fuller’s rickety bridge and traded his land to Fuller for the franchise.

Lake built a stronger bridge and moved it upstream to a better footing. He added an inn for weary travelers and even offered hot meals and libations at his tavern. The profits grew and so did “Lake Crossing.” By 1862 there was a grist mill, a livery stable and a kiln. Lake’s vision did not stop there.
Reno's Beginning Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
2. Reno's Beginning Marker
He lobbied hard for a transcontinental railroad to pass through his town before climbing the Sierra Nevada.

In 1888 the building was renamed the Riverside Hotel with a new owner and manager Harry Gosse. Gosse replaced the old wooden structure with brick. In 1922 the structure burned down and soon after George Wingfield purchased the property. Wingfield hired notable Nevada architect Frederic J. Delongchamps to design the new building. The landmark was finished in 1927 and began catering to Reno’s newest clientele, prospective divorcees taking advantage of the Silver State’s liberal laws regarding marital separations.

A new west wing and swimming pool were added, and the hotel went through a series of owners over the next 36 years until the building closed in 1986. Ten years later, community efforts to revitalize this cornerstone of Reno history created an artist’ enclave of residential lofts, an arts gallery, office space and commercial business.
 
Erected by Reno, The River Trail.
 
Location. 39° 31.502′ N, 119° 48.86′ W. Marker is in Reno, Nevada, in Washoe County. Marker is on North Sierra Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 11 North Sierra Street, Reno NV 89501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Reno's Beginnings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
3. Reno's Beginnings Marker
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Truckee River (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lake's Crossing (about 500 feet away); Site of Nevada’s First Public Library (about 600 feet away); Frederick Joseph DeLongechamps (about 600 feet away); Reno (about 700 feet away); Washoe County World War II Memorial (about 700 feet away); Spanish-American War Memorial 1898-1899 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major General Jesse Lee Reno (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Reno.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Reno's Beginnings Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
4. Reno's Beginnings Marker
Truckee River Recreation Map image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
5. Truckee River Recreation Map
The Truckee River image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
6. The Truckee River
The Truckee River image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, September 28, 2014
7. The Truckee River
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. This page has been viewed 251 times since then and 15 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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