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Danbury in Stokes County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Moody Tavern

Stoneman's Headquarters

 

—Confederate Lifeline —

 
Moody Tavern Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 21, 2014
1. Moody Tavern Marker
Inscription. Early in April 1865, Union Gen. George Stoneman’s cavalry moved from Tennessee into Virginia and then south through Danbury to destroy railroad track, warehouses, and supplies that supported Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Stoneman led 4,000-5,000 men as a long train of supply and ambulance wagons, artillery pieces and caissons, and pack mules. He expected to encounter resistance in Stokes County but found none. While in Danbury on April 9-10, Stoneman established his headquarters here at Moody’s Tavern. The second floor of the structure offered a commanding view of the area from its east-and west-facing rooms, allowing Stoneman and his staff to observe his camp and any approaching enemy forces.

During Stoneman’s occupation of the county, his men put the nearby Moratock Iron Works out of commission. The Confederacy relied on this and similar charcoal-fired furnaces to furnish iron for the foundries that produced cannons, swords, and rifles.

Stoneman soon received word of Lee’s surrender in Virginia at Appomattox Court House on April 9. Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s surrender near Durham, North Carolina, on April 23 effectively ended the war, and Stoneman led his men back to Tennessee.

(sidebar)
Gen. George Stoneman was born in Lakewood, N.Y., on August 8, 1822. He graduated in 1846
Moody Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 21, 2014
2. Moody Tavern
from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, where his roommate his junior year was Thomas J. Jackson, later nicknamed Stonewall. After graduation, Stoneman served in the Mexican War and was then assigned to California. He returned there after the Civil War and served as governor, 1883-1887. Later, in ill health, he moved to Buffalo, N.Y., where he died on September 5, 1894.

(captions)
(lower left) McCandless Hotel, ca. 1830. Nathaniel Moody constructed this tavern before 1860 to accommodate visitors to the mineral springs, and Dr. W.W. McCandless bought the Inn in 1870. Moody and John Pepper also built the nearby Moratock Iron Furnace, called “Moody’s Tunnel Iron Works,” in 1843.
(upper right) Gen. George Stoneman - Courtesy Library of Congress
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 36° 24.569′ N, 80° 12.378′ W. Marker is in Danbury, North Carolina, in Stokes County. Marker is at the intersection of Courthouse Circle and Main Street (North Carolina Route 8/89), on the left when traveling north on Courthouse Circle. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Danbury NC 27016, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Moody Tavern image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 21, 2014
3. Moody Tavern
At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stokes County Troops C.S.A (a few steps from this marker); Stokes County World War I Monument (a few steps from this marker); Stoneman’s Raid (within shouting distance of this marker); Stack-Bickett Law Office (within shouting distance of this marker); Gabriel Moore (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Moratock Furnace (approx. 0.3 miles away); Moratock Iron Furnace (approx. half a mile away); Lewis David von Schweinitz (approx. 1.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Danbury.
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWar, US Civil
 
Moody Tavern-Courthouse Circle and CWT sign image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe, August 21, 2014
4. Moody Tavern-Courthouse Circle and CWT sign
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. This page has been viewed 399 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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