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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dinwiddie in Dinwiddie County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The War of 1812 / Winfield Scott

 
 
The War of 1812 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 17, 2014
1. The War of 1812 Marker
Inscription.
(side 1)
The War of 1812

Impressment of Americans into British service and the violation of American ships were among the causes of America’s War of 1812 with the British, which lasted until 1815. Beginning in 1813, Virginians suffered from a British naval blockade of the Chesapeake Bay and from British troops’ plundering the countryside by the Bay and along the James, Rappahannock, and Potomac rivers. The Virginia militia deflected a British attempt to take Norfolk in 1813, and engaged British forces throughout the war. By the end of the war, more than 2,000 enslaved African Americans in Virginia had gained their freedom aboard British ships.

(side 2)
Winfield Scott
(1786-1866)


Winfield Scott, one of America’s early military heroes, was born nearby. He attended the College of William and Mary and in 1807 received a U.S. Army commission. During the War of 1812, wounded twice, he was promoted to brigadier general. He became Army general in chief in 1841. He commanded the amphibious force that captured Mexico City in 1848, ending the Mexican-American War. Scott remained loyal during the Civil War, and his Anaconda Plan—blockading the Southern coast and severing the Confederacy in the West—presaged eventual Union victory. Scott retired in Nov. 1861
Winfield Scott Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 17, 2014
2. Winfield Scott Marker
and died at West Point, N.Y.
 
Erected 2011 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number K 337.)
 
Location. 37° 4.699′ N, 77° 35.19′ W. Marker is in Dinwiddie, Virginia, in Dinwiddie County. Marker is at the intersection of Boydton Plank Road (U.S. 1) and Main Street, on the right when traveling south on Boydton Plank Road. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Dinwiddie VA 23841, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Early Education in Dinwiddie County (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Dinwiddie Court House (about 400 feet away); Battle of Dinwiddie Court House (about 400 feet away); Scott's Law Office (about 700 feet away); Dinwiddie Courthouse (about 800 feet away); Vaughan Road (approx. 0.3 miles away); Chamberlain's Bed (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); Campaign of 1781 (approx. 1.5 miles away but has been reported missing). Click for a list of all markers in Dinwiddie.
 
Categories. African AmericansPatriots & PatriotismWar of 1812War, Mexican-AmericanWar, US Civil
 
Boydton Plank Rd (facing north) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 17, 2014
3. Boydton Plank Rd (facing north)
Boydton Plank Rd (facing south) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 17, 2014
4. Boydton Plank Rd (facing south)
Winfield Scott image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
5. Winfield Scott
This 1814 plaster sculpture by William Rush is in the National Portrait Gallery Washington DC.

“At six feet, five inches, Winfield Scott was a ‘God of War’ Young and arrogant, Scott emerged during the war of 1812, when new military leadership was desperately needed. ‘Shall war come at last,’ he wrote, ‘my enthusiasm will be rekindled; and then who knows but that I may yet write my history with my sword.’ His victory at Chippewa and his bravery at Lundy's Lane quickley elevated him to hero status. Scott went on to become the commander of the American army, creating the forces that would fight the Mexican American War and the Civil War.” — National Portrait Gallery
Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, U.S.A. image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, November 22, 2014
6. Lt. Gen. Winfield Scott, U.S.A.
Civil War Centennial memorial plaque displayed in the Dinwiddie Courthouse
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 419 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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