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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dartmouth in Halifax Regional Municipality, Nova Scotia — The Canadian Atlantic
 

Historic Shubenacadie Canal System

Lock 3

 

—1824-31 ——— 1856-70 —

 
Historic Shubenacadie Canal System Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 15, 2014
1. Historic Shubenacadie Canal System Marker
Inscription. At the point you are approximately 26 meters above sea level, almost at the height of Lake Charles from which the water flows in two directions - south to the Harbour and north to the Bay of Fundy. To get to this point vessels would have traveled from the Harbour to Sullivan’s Pond (lift of 15m) via the inclined plain which no longer exists and passed through Locks 1, 2 and 3.

This area of the canal provides an excellent opportunity to view all the components of a lock system - lock, dam and waste water weir. Construction of Lock 3, which lifted and lowered vessels approximately 4m was completed in 1857. This is the best preserved of the “composite” or American style locks designed by Charles Fairbanks following a tour of canals in New England. This structure replaced a granite stone lock built in the late 1820’s but never used. The new wooden planking on the walls of the lock and the wooden gates were added in 1987.

In order to provide a sufficient depth of water in the channel leading to Lake Charles, earth and rock banks were constructed on the low side of the channel and a dam was built on either side of the lock. The water level in the channel and holding pond could be controlled by the waste weir on the far side of the pond. This control was essential in order to allow repairs to be made to the lock
Historic Shubenacadie Canal System Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 15, 2014
2. Historic Shubenacadie Canal System Marker
and dam and to control flood waters.

(Sidebar on the left. To enlarge the map, click of the photo image.)

• Used by the Mi’kmaq for centuries, the Shubenacadie waterway was carved out of the bedrock by glaciers during the last ice age.
• Work on the Canal system began in 1826, ceased in 1831 and resumed in 1854. The Canal was completed in 1861. Construction of 9 locks, and 2 incline planes connected the chain of 7 lakes and the Shubenacadie River enabling boats to travel from Halifax Harbour to the Minas Basin.
• The Shubenacadie Canal opened in sections and operated between 1856 and 1870. Steam vessels hauled barges laden with goods along the System.
• By 1870, railways were able to transport goods cheaper and faster forcing closure of the Canal.
• Today the Shubenacadie Canal System is a National Historic Civil Engineering site and a popular recreation and heritage corridor.
 
Erected 2001 by Imperial Order Daughters of the Empire (IODE), Robin Hood Chapter.
 
Location. 44° 42.129′ N, 63° 33.271′ W. Marker is in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, in Halifax Regional Municipality. Marker can be reached from Lock Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 54 Lock Road, Dartmouth, Nova Scotia B2X, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers.
Lock 3 image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, June 15, 2014
3. Lock 3
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Fairbanks Solution (a few steps from this marker); Official Groundbreaking 1829 (within shouting distance of this marker); Canal Shubenacadie Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Waste Weir and Holding Pond (within shouting distance of this marker); Before the Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Of Bough and Bark (about 120 meters away, measured in a direct line); Navvies Dwelling (about 180 meters away); A Village of the Most Primitive Description (about 210 meters away). Click for a list of all markers in Dartmouth.
 
More about this marker. This marker is in Shubie Park near the bridge over Lock 3.
 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 252 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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