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Lexington in Oglethorpe County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe

 
 
Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 10, 2015
1. Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker
Inscription.
Oglethorpe, the fifth county created in Georgia, Dec. 19, 1793 was named for James Edward Oglethorpe, founder and first governor of Georgia.

Born in London, Dec. 22, 1696, Oglethorpe started his early life in Godalming, England. He was a philanthropist, soldier and member of house of commons.

Oglethorpe arrived with the first Georgia colonists at Yamacraw Bluff on Feb. 12, 1733, and started the settlement of Savannah. As war threatened between England and Spain, Oglethorpe defeated the Spaniards at the Battle of Bloody Marsh, July 1742.

Oglethorpe died in Cranham, England June 30, 1785 and is buried within All Saints Parish church.
 
Location. 33° 52.15′ N, 83° 6.693′ W. Marker is in Lexington, Georgia, in Oglethorpe County. Marker is on West Main Street (State Highway 22), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is on the Oglethorpe County Courthouse grounds. Marker is at or near this postal address: 111 West Main Street, Lexington GA 30648, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Oglethorpe County Veterans Monument (a few steps from this marker); James T. Rayle Post No. 123 Monument (a few steps from this marker); Oglethorpe County Confederate Monument
Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, October 4, 2015
2. Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Governor Gilmer’s Home (within shouting distance of this marker); Oglethorpe County (within shouting distance of this marker); Beth-Salem Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Meson Academy (approx. 0.2 miles away); Wm H Crawford (approx. 2.7 miles away); Veterans of Oglethorpe County (approx. 2.7 miles away); A Memorial to William Harris Crawford (approx. 3.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lexington.
 
Also see . . .
1. James Edward Oglethorpe. James Edward Oglethorpe (22 December 1696 – 30 June 1785) was a British general, Member of Parliament, philanthropist, and founder of the colony of Georgia. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. James Oglethorpe (1696-1785). As visionary, James Oglethorpe, the founder of Georgia, was a forward-thinking visionary who demonstrated great skill as a social reformer and military leader. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. James Edward Oglethorpe. When he was a
Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott
3. Gen. James Edward Oglethorpe
boy, James Edward Oglethorpe's oldest brother and father went off to fight in Queen Anne's War (War of Spanish Succession, 1702-1714), never to return. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Battle of Bloody Marsh. The Battle of Bloody Marsh took place on July 18, 1742 between Spanish and British forces on St. Simons Island, part of the Province of Georgia, resulting in a victory for the British. Part of a much larger conflict known as the War of Jenkins' Ear, the battle was for the British fortifications of Fort Frederica and Fort St. Simons, with the strategic goal the sea routes and inland waters they controlled. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Battle of Bloody Marsh. On July 7, 1742, English and Spanish forces skirmished on St. Simons Island in an encounter later known as the Battle of Bloody Marsh. Once formal hostilities began in 1739 between the Spanish and English over the land between South Carolina and Florida, shipping on the Atlantic Ocean suffered frequent interruption from acts of piracy by both sides. These skirmishes escalated into the War of Jenkins' Ear and the Battle of Bloody Marsh. This event was the only Spanish attempt to invade Georgia during the War of Jenkins' Ear, and it resulted in a significant English victory. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. The Battle of Bloody Marsh - St. Simons Island, Georgia. The ferocity of the fighting at Bloody Marsh grew quite a bit in the telling over the years, with the battle taking its name from tradition that the marsh ran red with the blood of dead Spanish soldiers. While this may be true, the actual number of Spanish killed was seven. (Submitted on October 23, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Notable Persons
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 220 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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