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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Thamesville in Chatham-Kent County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

Battle of Moraviantown, 1813

Bataille de Moraviantown, 1813

 

—(Battle of the Thames) / (Bataille de la Thames) —

 
Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker (English side) image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
1. Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker (English side)
Inscription. English
In September 1813, during the second year of the War of 1812, the United States won control of Lake Erie, cutting British supply lines with the east and forcing the British to withdraw from the Detroit River region. Then, on October 5, 1813, 3,000 Americans, including their Aboriginal allies, defeated 950 British, Canadians, and Natives at this site. Among those killed was the famous Shawnee leader, Tecumseh, who had worked to unite the First Nations in neighbouring American territory to resist settlers expansion into their homelands and unwanted influence in their lives. The battle place a small part of Upper Canada under enemy occupation until 1815, when the War of 1812 ended and it returned to British control. Tecumseh’s dream, however, largely died with him, as the war only delayed American expansion into Indigenous territory in Ohio, Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois.

French
En septembre 1813, au cours de la deuxième année de la guerre de 1812, le États-Unis s’emparent du contrôle du lac Erie, coupant les voies d’approvisionnement britanniques avec l’Est et forçent les Britanniques à se retirer de la région de la riviére Detroit. Le 5 octobre 1813, 3 000 Américains et leurs alliés autochtones battent ici 950 Britanniques, Canadiens, et Autochtones. Citons au nombre des personnes que périssent
Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker (French side) image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
2. Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker (French side)
le célèbre chef shawnee, Tecumseh, qui avait oeuvé à l’unification des Premières Nations sur le territoire américain avoisinant pour lutter contre la colonisation de leurs terres et s’opposer à l’influence indésirable des colons sur leur mode de vie. À l’issue de cette bataille, une petit partie du Haut-Canada est occupée par l’ennemi jusqu’à la fin de la guerre de 1812, en 1815, dateà laquelle elle repasse sous contrôle britannique. Cependant, le rêve de Tecumseh meurt en grande partie avec lui, car la guerre n’aura fait que retarder l’expansion américaine sur les territories autochtones de l’Ohio, du Michigan, de l’Indiana et de l’Illinois.
 
Erected by Ontario Heritage Trust.
 
Location. 42° 33.931′ N, 81° 55.858′ W. Marker is in Thamesville, Ontario, in Chatham-Kent County. Marker is on Longwoods Road (County Route 2), on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 14376 Longwoods Road, Thamesville, Ontario N0P, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Tecumseh (within shouting distance of this marker); Prelude to Battle (within shouting distance of this marker); Why Choose This Site? (within shouting distance of this marker); Participants in the Battle of the Thames
Gii-Miigaading Pundgonong, 1813 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
3. Gii-Miigaading Pundgonong, 1813 Marker
This marker, next to the marker above, is in an unidentified First Nations language (possibly Ojibwe?). Click on this image to enlarge it.
(about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Participants in the Battle of the Thames (about 90 meters away); a different marker also named Participants in the Battle of the Thames (about 90 meters away); a different marker also named Participants in the Battle of the Thames (about 120 meters away); a different marker also named Participants in the Battle of the Thames (about 120 meters away). Click for a list of all markers in Thamesville.
 
More about this marker. These markers are located on unnamed side road leading south along with other markers relating to the Battle of the Thames.
 
Also see . . .  Battle of the Thames (Moraviantown) - War of 1812. The Battle of the Thames (sometimes called the Battle of Moraviantown) occurred 5 October 1813, during the War of 1812. Following the American naval victory under Captain Oliver H. Perry in the Battle of Lake Erie at Put-in-Bay on 10 September 1813, the entire western peninsula of Upper Canada was in danger of falling into enemy hands. Major General Henry Procter, who commanded all British and Canadian
Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 11, 2014
4. Battle of Moraviantown, 1813 Marker
forces west of Burlington, was short of supplies and decided to retreat up the River Thames.
(Submitted on October 29, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar of 1812
 
The Death of Tecumseh image. Click for full size.
By Currier and Ives, 1846
5. The Death of Tecumseh
Print shows Col. R.M. Johnson using a pistol to kill Tecumseh during the War of 1812, at the battle of the Thames in Ontario, Canada.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 361 times since then and 7 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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