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Near Dresden in Chatham-Kent County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

The Dawn Settlement

La Colonie de Dawn

 
 
The Dawn Settlement Marker (English side) image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 12, 2014
1. The Dawn Settlement Marker (English side)
Inscription. English
In the 1830s, the Reverend Josiah Henson and other abolitionists sought ways to provide refugees from slavery with the education and skills they needed to become self-sufficient in Upper Canada. They purchased 200 acres of land here in 1841 and established the British American Institute, one of the first schools in Canada to emphasize vocational training. The community of Dawn developed around the institute. Its residents farmed, attended the institute, and worked at sawmills, grist-mills, and other local industries. Some returned to the United States after emancipation was proclaimed in 1863. Others remained, contributing to the establishment of a significant black community in this part of the province.

French
Dans les années 1830, le pasteur Josiah Henson et d’autres abolitionnistes cherchent des moyens de donner aux rescapés de l’esclavage l’éducation et les habiletés qu’il leur faillait pour pouvoir subvenir à leurs propres besoins dans le Haut-Canada. En 1841, ils achètent 200 acres de terrain ici et créent le British American Institute, une des premières écoles au Canada à mettre l’accent sur l’apprentissage d’un métier. La communauté de Dawn se développe autour de l’institut. Ses résidents vivent de l’agriculture, fréquentant l’institut et travaillent dans les scieries, les moulins à
The Dawn Settlement Marker (French side) image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 12, 2014
2. The Dawn Settlement Marker (French side)
grain et d’autres industries locales. Certains retournent aux États-Unis après le proclamation de l’émancipation en 1863. D’autres restent sur place et contribuent à la création d’une importante communauté notre dans cette région de la province.
 
Erected by Ontario Heritage Trust.
 
Location. 42° 35.09′ N, 82° 11.77′ W. Marker is near Dresden, Ontario, in Chatham-Kent County. Marker is at the intersection of Uncle Tom's Road and Park Street, on the right when traveling west on Uncle Tom's Road. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 29252 Uncle Tom's Road, Dresden, Ontario N0P, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 18 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Harris House (within shouting distance of this marker); Sawmill (within shouting distance of this marker); Spirituality and Community (within shouting distance of this marker); Henson House (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); Josiah Henson (about 90 meters away); The Founding of Dresden (approx. 1.5 kilometers away); Burning of British Ships / American Encampment (approx. 16.7 kilometers away); The Legend of the Paw Paw (approx. 16.7 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Dresden.
 
Also see . . .
1. Dresden /The Dawn Settlement - Black History Canada
The Dawn Settlement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 12, 2014
3. The Dawn Settlement Marker
. Upon entering Canada, (Josiah Henson) was able to establish a settlement, with the support of anti-slavery workers that offered an industrial training school, which included a mill and a sawmill, for Black people. Henson was convinced that it was necessary to live apart from others and build up skill levels before trying to live in an integrated way. At one point as many as 500 people lived there. (Submitted on October 29, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Uncle Tom's Cabin - Dawn Settlement- Ontario Historical Trust. Josiah Henson used his freedom to help establish the Dawn Settlement – a community where Blacks could share their skills, labour and resources to help each other and give aid to newly arriving settlers. This spirit of co-operation was embodied by the church, one of the Black community’s most important institutions. The church served as a place of worship and a centre for meetings, educational, recreation and social activities. (Submitted on October 29, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 357 times since then and 24 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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