“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Dresden in Chatham-Kent County, Ontario — Central Canada

Henson House

Maison Henson

Henson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 12, 2014
1. Henson House Marker
Captions (English / French): The Henson House in 1948 before it became an museum./ Le maison Henson en 1948 avant qu’elle ne soit transformée en musée.; The Henson House being relocated here in 1964. / Réinstallation de la mansion Henson à cet emplacement, en 1964.; Uncle Tom’s Cabin relocated on knoll overlooking his grave near Dresden.
Inscription. English
Built in the mid-19th century, this house was the last residence of Josiah Henson and his second wife, Nancy Gambril, who lived in it until Henson’s death in 1883. Henson’s house was substantial in size compared to other residential buildings in the area at the time and stands as a symbol of his status in the community.

After Henson’s death, the house underwent changes under several different owners before William Chapple purchased it in 1940. In 1948 he opened the house as a museum, moved it to a new site and attempted to return the house to its original condition. Jack Thomson purchased the house in 1964 and relocated it here, one-half kilometer northeast of its original location.

Chapple’s and Thomson’s efforts to restore Henson’s house as a museum ensured its survival at a time when the architectural conservation movement had not yet been popularized in Ontario. Henson House is significant for its association with Reverend Josiah Henson and is an example of mid-19th century vernacular domestic architecture.

Construite au milieu de 19ᵉ siècle, cette maison fut la dernière résidence de Josiah Henson et de sa seconde femme, Nancy Gambril, qui y vécurent jusqu’au décès de Henson, en 1883. Cette maison était de taille imposante comparée aux autres bâtiments
Henson House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 12, 2014
2. Henson House Marker
résidentiels de la région, à l’époque, et symbolise son statut au sein de la communauté.

Après le décès de Henson, la maison fut transformée par plusieurs propriétaires, avant d’être achetée par William Chapple, en 1940. En 1948, il transforma la maison en musée, l’installa sur un nouveau site et essaya de lui redonner son apparence d’antan. Jack Thomson acheta la maison en 1964 plus la réinstalla ice, a un demi-kilomètre au nord-est de son emplacement original.

Les efforts déployés par Chapple et Thomson pour restaurer la maison Henson de la transformer en musée permirent d’assurer sa survie à une époque oû le mouvement de conservation architecturale n’était pas encore devenu populaire en Ontario. La maison Henson revêt une importance de par son association avec le révérend Josiah Henson et en tant qu’exemple d’architecture canadienne vernaculaire du milieu de 19ᵉ siècle.
Erected by Ontario Heritage Trust.
Location. 42° 35.133′ N, 82° 11.75′ W. Marker is near Dresden, Ontario, in Chatham-Kent County. Marker can be reached from Uncle Tom's Road just from Park Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 29251 Uncle Tom's Road, Dresden, Ontario N0P, Canada.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within
Henson House image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, n/a
3. Henson House
18 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Spirituality and Community (a few steps from this marker); Sawmill (within shouting distance of this marker); Josiah Henson (within shouting distance of this marker); Harris House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Dawn Settlement (about 90 meters away, measured in a direct line); The Founding of Dresden (approx. 1.4 kilometers away); Burning of British Ships / American Encampment (approx. 16.8 kilometers away); The Legend of the Paw Paw (approx. 16.8 kilometers away). Click for a list of all markers in Dresden.
More about this marker. The Henson House is on the grounds of the Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site.
Also see . . .  Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site. Uncle Tom's Cabin Historic Site commemorates the life of Rev. Josiah Henson (1796-1883). Recognized for his contributions to the abolition movement and his work in the Underground Railroad, Henson rose to international fame after Harriet Beecher Stowe acknowledged his memoirs as a source for her anti-slavery novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Henson's dramatic experiences in slavery and his abolitionist work in Canada helped make him renowned throughout the world. (Submitted on October 30, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
Categories. African Americans
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 261 times since then and 80 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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