Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Powhatan Point in Belmont County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point / Powhatan Disaster, 1944

 
 
The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, November 2, 2014
1. The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point Marker
Inscription. Side 1
The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point
The Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seam, located 100 feet below river level at Powhatan Point, extends across much of eastern Ohio, western Pennsylvania, and northern West Virginia. The Cleveland and Western Coal Company, founded by Cleveland industrialist Frank E. Taplin, opened the Powhatan No. 1 mine here in 1922 to take advantage of both river and rail transportation. It became the largest deep mine in Ohio and was the first mine in the state to be completely mechanized. Reorganized as the North American Coal Corporation in 1925, the company operated seven shaft mines in this area during the twentieth century. Four of these mines closed between 1980 and 1984 as clean air standards made locally mined high-sulfur coal difficult to market.

Side 2
Powhatan Disaster, 1944
World War II held hazards for both soldiers and miners as coal mines maximized output for the war effort. On July 5, 1944, a section of roof fell in No. 3 entry at C North face of Powhatan No. 1, a mine with a dangerous reputation. A trolley wire shorted and ignited the coal seam, trapping sixty-six miners deep in the mine. Rescue and firefighting efforts failed, and officials sealed the mine to extinguish the blaze-also sealing the fate of the miners. This tragedy, which compounded
Powhatan Disaster, 1944 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, November 2, 2014
2. Powhatan Disaster, 1944 Marker
two 1940 disasters at the Hanna Coal Company's Willow Grove mine (72 dead) and Y&O Coal's Nelms mine (31 dead), deeply affected the close-knit community. The Powhatan fire was this area's last mining disaster of the twentieth century.
 
Erected 2001 by Ohio Bicentennial Commission, The Longaberger Company, Powhatan Improvement Committee, and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 6-7.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 51.845′ N, 80° 48.045′ W. Marker is in Powhatan Point, Ohio, in Belmont County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Allen Avenue and Philip Street. Click for map. Located across from the end of Philip Street in the town park. Marker is in this post office area: Powhatan Point OH 43942, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 5 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Powhatan Point (approx. ¼ mile away); George Washington (approx. ¼ mile away); Washington's Land (approx. 2.2 miles away in West Virginia); Baker's Station (approx. 4.3 miles away in West Virginia but has been reported missing); George Rogers Clark
The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, November 2, 2014
3. The Coal Industry at Powhatan Point Marker
(approx. 4.3 miles away in West Virginia but has been reported missing); Zachary Taylor (approx. 4.3 miles away in West Virginia but has been reported missing); Rosby’s Rock (approx. 4.4 miles away in West Virginia); West Virginia Penitentiary (approx. 4.7 miles away in West Virginia). Click for a list of all markers in Powhatan Point.
 
Categories. DisastersIndustry & CommerceWar, World II
 
Powhatan Disaster, 1944 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, November 2, 2014
4. Powhatan Disaster, 1944 Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 547 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement