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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Goffs in San Bernardino County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Pah-Ute Creek

Fort Pah-Ute

 

—Mojave Road —

 
Pah-Ute Creek Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, December 5, 2009
1. Pah-Ute Creek Marker
Inscription. Pah-Ute Creek, which runs year around, attracted many Indian tribes, who used several Indian trails through this area. The first white man to visit Pah-Ute Creek was Fr. Francisco Garces in May of 1776. It was given it's name by Lt. A.W. Whipple during his Pacific Railroad Expedition of 1854.

The War Department ordered, in 1857, that the Mojave Indian Trail be used as a wagon road from the Colorado River to the Pacific Ocean. It became known as the Mojave Road.

Fort Pah-Ute was established at this location for the protection of travelers and the U.S. Mail over the Mojave Road. The outpost existed from November 27th, 1867, to May 3, 1868 when it was ordered abandoned. The building was designed by Maj. General Irvin McDowell and Major Henry Robert. The fort was constructed by the men of Company D, 9th U.S. Infantry Regiment.
 
Erected 1990 by Billy Holcomb Chapter No. 1069, E Clampus Vitus and the Needles Resource Area of the Bureau of Land Management. (Marker Number 61.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus, and the The Mojave Road (Old Government Road) marker series.
 
Location. 34° 55.23′ N, 115° 4.068′ W. Marker is in Goffs, California, in San Bernardino County. Marker
Mojave Road Shack image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, December 5, 2009
2. Mojave Road Shack
is at the intersection of Lanfair Road and Goffs Road, on the right when traveling south on Lanfair Road. Click for map. Marker is located approximately 500 feet northwest of this intersection, behind the Mojave Road Shack building on the Mojave Desert Heritage & Cultural Association property. Marker is at or near this postal address: 37198 Lanfair Road, Essex CA 92332, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Army Camp at Goffs (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Goffs Schoolhouse (about 300 feet away); John Wilkie Safety Roadside Rest Area At Fenner (approx. 11.5 miles away); Clipper Divisional Camp (approx. 11.6 miles away); Fort Pah-Ute (approx. 14.2 miles away).
 
Regarding Pah-Ute Creek. Lt. Amiel Whipple, U.S. Army, while exploring the 35th parallel for a cross-country railroad route, camped at Piute Creek on March 3, 1854 and gave the Creek its name. The Whipple survey party, traveling with an equipment wagon, could not take the direct route up the canyon. They continued the trip by crossing Piute Hill. The grade over Piute Hill developed the reputation as one of the worst grades of all western roads. Upstream may be seen wheel ruts from steel-rimmed wagon wheels climbing up out of the canyon. SOURCE: Billy Holcomb Chapter 1069 35th Anniversary
Pah-Ute Creek image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, December 5, 2009
3. Pah-Ute Creek
Plaque Book by Phillip Holdaway

 
Also see . . .
1. Historic California Posts: Fort Piute (Fort Beale, Fort Piute Hill). Established in late 1859 by Captain James H. Carleton, 1st Dragoons, this desert post was located near Piute Springs in the foothills of the Mute Mountain range, about 25 miles west of Fort Mojave and 10 miles north of Goffs in San Bernardino County, a few miles west of the California-Nevada border Captain Carleton named the post Fort Beale for Lieutenant Edward F. Beale, U.S. Navy, who, in 1857-59, with his caravan of camels, explored the area for a wagon road. The fort, actually a subpost of Camp Cady, was one of a chain of military stations erected to protect the travel route from San Bernardino across the Mojave Desert to Fort Mojave. (Submitted on December 20, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.) 

2. Amiel Weeks Whipple (1818 - 1863). American soldier and topographical engineer. Born in Greenwich, Mass. He became a topographical engineer in the U.S. Army and engaged in surveying the U.S. borders with Canada and Mexico. (Submitted on December 22, 2011, by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologyForts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers
 
Pah-Ute Creek image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, November 21, 2009
4. Pah-Ute Creek
Wagon Ruts image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, December 5, 2009
5. Wagon Ruts
"Upstream may be seen wheel ruts from steel-rimmed wagon wheels climbing up out of the canyon."
Fort Pah-Ute image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, December 5, 2009
6. Fort Pah-Ute
Amiel Weeks Whipple image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
7. Amiel Weeks Whipple
Event Patch image. Click for full size.
By Michael Kindig, October 14, 1990
8. Event Patch
E Clampus Vitus
Fall 1990 - Billy Holcomb Chapter
For Piute
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. This page has been viewed 688 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   7. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California.   8. submitted on , by Michael Kindig of Long Beach, California. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on August 9, 2016.
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