“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fulton in Callaway County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)


Fulton Marker <i>Side A:</i> image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
1. Fulton Marker Side A:
Inscription. This is a two sided marker

Side A:

Fulton was founded here in the Little Dixie Region of Missouri, 1825, to replace the poorly located Elizabeth as seat of Callaway County. Named for a grandson of Daniel Boone and War of 1812 Ranger, Capt. James Callaway, the county was organized, 1820. The town name honors Robert Fulton.

Callaway County is popularly called the Kingdom of Callaway in memory of a War Between the States incident in 1861 when "Col." Jefferson Franklin Jones, leading a civilian army of Callaway men, negotiated with Union Gen. John B. Henderson and got him to agree not to invade Callaway if Jones disbanded his men. Later Fulton was often occupied by Union Troops.

Here is the Missouri School for the Deaf, first such school west of the Mississippi, founded in 1851; Presbyterian Westminster College for men, founded 1851, chartered, 1853; and a Christian Church junior college for women, William Woods, founded, 1869, at Camden Point, moved here, 1890. State Hospital No.1 for mentally ill, chartered, 1847, opened here, 1851, is one of the first three such hospitals west of the Mississippi.

Side B:

Fulton is the capital of the Kingdom of Callaway, a county early noted for its fine horses and its pioneering in development of the famous Missouri mule.

Fulton Marker <i>Side B:</i> image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
2. Fulton Marker Side B:
on the Missouri River, is the site of Cote sans Dessein (hill without design). A French trading post, and first settlement in the county, 1808, it was the scene of an Indian attack in the War of 1812. In 1821, Cote sans Dessein was the first place considered for the Missouri state capital, but faulty land titles stood in the way.

Here at Westminster College a plaque marks the site where the phrase "Iron Curtain" was first used in a 1946 speech by English wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill. Also of interest are a museum collection at William Woods College, and, in town, a statue of Capt. James Callaway.

William D. Kerr (1808-89), was first head of School for the Deaf, and Dr. Turner R.H. Smith (1820-85), of Hospital No.1. Here lived novelists Nathan C. Kouns (1833-90); G.W. Hamilton (1845-1909); Caroline A. Stanley (1849-1919); Henry Bellamann (1882-1945).
Erected 1955 by State Historical Society of Missouri and State Highway Commission.
Marker series. This marker is included in the Missouri, State Historical Society of marker series.
Location. 38° 50.992′ N, 91° 56.824′ W. Marker is in Fulton, Missouri, in Callaway County. Marker is on South Market Street south of St. Louis Avenue, on the right when traveling
Fulton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
3. Fulton Marker
south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fulton MO 65251, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Callaway County Men at War (approx. 0.2 miles away); War Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away); Boone's Rock (approx. 0.2 miles away); Captain James Callaway (approx. 0.2 miles away); Robertson Historic District (approx. 0.4 miles away); Memorial Park (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named War Memorial (approx. 0.4 miles away); The National Winston Churchill Museum (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fulton.
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
Fulton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 4, 2014
4. Fulton Marker
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 252 times since then and 77 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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