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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manhattan in Geary County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Fort Riley & Junction City

 
 
Fort Riley & Junction City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 20, 2014
1. Fort Riley & Junction City Marker
Inscription. Approximately 7 miles ahead is the southern edge of Fort Riley, established as a military post in 1853. Horace Greeley, noted editor of the New York Tribune, visited the fort in 1859. Of Fort Riley he said, “I hear that two millions of Uncle Sams money have been expended in making these snug arrangements, and that the oats largely here have often cost three dollars per bushel!”

The Seventh U.S. Cavalry, which played a significant role in the campaigns against Plains Indians, organized at Fort Riley in 1866 with George A. Custer second in command. Fort Riley remained a cavalry post through World War II, after which it became an infantry training facility.

At the southeast corner of the fort just north of I-70 is Marshall Army Airfield. Dating to as early as 1912, it is one of the armya oldest airports.

Junction City, approximately four miles beyond, was incorporated in 1859 and is named for its location at the junction of the Smoky Hill and Republican Rivers. The Junction City Downtown Historic District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Erected by State of Kansas. (Marker Number 98.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kansas Historical Society marker series.
 
Location.
Fort Riley & Junction City Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 20, 2014
2. Fort Riley & Junction City Marker
39° 4.016′ N, 96° 37.319′ W. Marker is in Manhattan, Kansas, in Geary County. Marker is on Interstate 70 at milepost 310, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Manhattan KS 66502, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Historical Kansas (a few steps from this marker); Purple Heart Trail in Kansas (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Historical Kansas (approx. 0.4 miles away); Veteran's Memorial (approx. 5.9 miles away); Ogden (approx. 5.9 miles away); The Tallgrass Prairie (approx. 6.3 miles away); Konza Prairie (approx. 6.4 miles away); Geology at Konza (approx. 6.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Manhattan.
 
More about this marker. This marker is located at the roadside rest on the north-side (westbound) of Interstate 70.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Riley, Kansas - History & Hauntings - Legends of America. The site of Fort Riley was chosen by surveyors in the fall of 1852 and was first called Camp Center, due to its proximity to the geographical center of the United States. The following spring, three companies of the 6th infantry began the construction of temporary quarters at the camp. (Submitted on November 14, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 

2. Our History - City of Junction City. Famous guests of the Historic Bartell Hotel include: Mr. Adllphus Busch, Sally Rand, Gene Tierney, John Phillip Sousa, W.C. Fields, Gloria Vanderbilt, Dan Dailey, and John Wayne. In January 1872, Russian Grand Duke Alexis was feted with a dinner given by the townspeople, with Mayor Robert O. Rizer as host. The Duke had been on a buffalo hunt and stopped here on his way to attend a session of the Kansas Legislature. (Submitted on November 14, 2014, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 180 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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