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Near Bradley in Monterey County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Misión San Antonio de Padua

(Turn Off 5 Miles North)

 
 
Misión San Antonio de Padua Marker image. Click for full size.
By James King, May 20, 2011
1. Misión San Antonio de Padua Marker
Inscription. Located in the valley of the San Antonio River within the Santa Lucia Range, Misión San Antonio de Padua, established on July 14, 1771, was the third in a series of missions founded in Alta California by Father Junípero Serra. Its picturesque setting makes it one of today's most outstanding examples of early mission life.
 
Erected by The State Department of Parks and Recreation, in cooperation with the California Historical Landmarks Advisory Committee, and the Department of Public Works. (Marker Number 232.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Historical Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 35° 49.867′ N, 120° 45.483′ W. Marker is near Bradley, California, in Monterey County. Marker is on U.S. 101 Spur, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. The marker is located at the rest stop on U.S. Highway 101, 1.45 miles north of the Bradley/East Garrison exit (#245). Marker is in this post office area: Bradley CA 93426, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Roberts Veterans Memorial (approx. 2.5 miles away); De Anza Trek Reinactment (approx. 2.6 miles away); Original Site Of San Miguel School
Misión San Antonio de Padua Monument image. Click for full size.
By James King, May 20, 2011
2. Misión San Antonio de Padua Monument
(approx. 6.5 miles away); Elkhorn Saloon (approx. 6.5 miles away); Lt. Col. John C. Fremont (approx. 6.8 miles away); Mission Cemetery (approx. 6.9 miles away); Mission Fields (approx. 6.9 miles away); Cross of El Camino Real (approx. 6.9 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Bradley.
 
Regarding Misión San Antonio de Padua. Mission San Antonio is actually 33 miles away on the Fort Hunter Liggett military reservation. Travel north on U.S. 101 to Jolon Road, take Jolon Road northwest to the fort. Turn in through the main gate and go another 6.2 miles to the mission. Access may be limited during times of training at the fort.

This is one of the few California missions to not have a town grow up around it. Because of that, much of the original infrastructure is still visible on the mission grounds with many explanatory signs.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Official Website of Mission San Antonio de Padua. Located on eighty pristine acres on what was once the Milpitas unit of the sprawling Hearst Ranch, Mission San Antonio de Padua sits
Entrance to Fort Hunter Liggett image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
3. Entrance to Fort Hunter Liggett
within the “Valley of the Oaks” on California’s scenic Central Coast.
(Submitted on December 1, 2012, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

2. Monterey County Historical Society Page. Mission San Antonio de Padua was established by Junípero Serra on July 14, 1771 in the San Antonio Valley, in southwestern Monterey County. This location had been favored by the Portolá expedition in 1769. They had given their campsite the name "La Hoya de la Sierra de Santa Lucia." (Submitted on December 1, 2012, by James King of San Miguel, California.) 

3. California Missions Resource Page. (Submitted on December 1, 2012, by James King of San Miguel, California.)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.Settlements & Settlers
 
Mission San Antonio de Padua Sign image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
4. Mission San Antonio de Padua Sign
On July 14, 1771 Padre Serra hung (a) bell in an oak tree and rang it to call the Indians to the founding of Mission San Antonio. The original oak, which has since been destroyed, stood 1½ miles to the southwest. In 1773 because of need of (a) better water supply, the mission was moved to the location where it now stands.
Mission San Antonio de Padua image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
5. Mission San Antonio de Padua
5844 Foot Junipero Serra Peak, highest in the Santa Lucia Range, in the distance to the left.
Mission San Antonio de Padua image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
6. Mission San Antonio de Padua
Mission San Antonio de Padua Arcade image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
7. Mission San Antonio de Padua Arcade
Mission San Antonio de Padua Arcade image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
8. Mission San Antonio de Padua Arcade
Mission San Antonio de Padua image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
9. Mission San Antonio de Padua
Inside the Chapel Looking Toward the Altar image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
10. Inside the Chapel Looking Toward the Altar
Inside the Chapel Looking Toward the Vestibule image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
11. Inside the Chapel Looking Toward the Vestibule
18th Century Painting image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
12. 18th Century Painting
by an anonymous Mexican artist. This is an artist copy of a work commissioned for a French church - original by Jean Cousin Le Jeune dated 1585. A fine art example of a genre of paintings employed by padres as teaching aids.
These Priests Entombed Here image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
13. These Priests Entombed Here
A)-Padre Buenaventura Sitjar, O.F.M. Born in Majorca December 9, 1739 • Arrived in California March 12, 1771 • Present at founding of Mission San Antonio July 14, 1771 • Served here 36 years where he died September 3, 1808

B)- Padre Francisco Pujol, O.F.M. Born in Villa de Alos, Spain, March 7, 1862 • Came to California in 1795 • Died here March 15, 1801

C)- Padre Juan Bautista Sancho, O.F.M. Born in Majorca December 1, 1772 • Arrived in California in 1803 • Served this mission for 26 years where he died February 11, 1830

D)- Padre Vicente de Sarria, O.F.M. Born in Estevan, Spain, 1767 • Came to California in 1809 • Died of want and hunger at Mission Soledad in 1835 • Carried here by Indians for burial

E)- Reverend Doroteo Ambris Born in Mexico • Served this mission from 1851-1882 • Died here February 5, 1882

This plaque erected by Mrs. Florence Dodson-Schoneman and the Native Daughters of the Golden West - 1966
Grave Markers Near The Mission Entrance image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
14. Grave Markers Near The Mission Entrance
Edward McDonagh, died March 12, 1889 aged 74 years
Mary McDonagh, died Dec. 25, 1906 aged 82 years
Mary A Grayson, died Nov. 11, 1884 aged 35 years
Grave Marker Near The Mission Entrance image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
15. Grave Marker Near The Mission Entrance
Aqui yacen los restos de
Maximiana G. de Aldaco
Murio el 25 de Mayo 1882
First Marriage in California image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
16. First Marriage in California
(Located inside the entryway below the campanário)
The first marriage in California took place at this Mission between Juan María Ruiz of El Fuerte, Sonora, Mexico, 25 years of age, and Margaríta de Cortona, 22, a Salinian woman of Mission San Antonio, on the sixteenth of May in the year of Our Lord 1773.
Padres' Garden image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
17. Padres' Garden
Fountain image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
18. Fountain
Sundial image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
19. Sundial
This Rose Garden is dedicated to the memory of Marie G. Trescony for her love of San Antonio Mission and her zealous efforts for its restoration.
The Franciscan Fathers of California
June 11, 1961
Mission Grapes image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
20. Mission Grapes
These grapes are from the original stock cultivated in the vineyard of this mission.
Original Olive Tree image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
21. Original Olive Tree
Planted in orchard surrounded by Indian houses.
Olive Tree Planted by Padres About 1836 image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
22. Olive Tree Planted by Padres About 1836
It has been claimed by experts that the Mission Olive as well as the Mission Grape has not been identified with any of the varieties now cultivated in Europe. Olive seeds, and perhaps some cuttings, were brought by the padres to the missions as early as 1769. Thirty years later olive culture at the missions was an assured success.
Mission Walls image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
23. Mission Walls
are made of adobe bricks made by Indians of mud with straw formed in moulds and dried in sun.
Adobe Bricks image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
24. Adobe Bricks
San Antonio Mission is constructed of sun-dried unburnt bricks. Mission adobes were generally 11" by 23" by 4" and weighed about 60 pounds. These dirt bricks were made of mud with straw which was pressed into wooden molds. When the frames were lifted, the bricks were first left to dry flat on the ground then set on edge to cure in the sun.
Adobe Bricks image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
25. Adobe Bricks
Freshly made adobe bricks for ongoing restoration efforts.
Adobe Bricks image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
26. Adobe Bricks
Dollar bill for scale
Cobblestone Foundations image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
27. Cobblestone Foundations
mark the outline of the adobe brick building which ran parallel to the church. The foundations are 3½ feet wide. The building was 218 feet long and 30 feet wide. Cobblestone foundation lines also indicate the room partitions. This building was subject to decay after 1845.
Cobblestone Foundations image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
28. Cobblestone Foundations
Mission Bell Plaque image. Click for full size.
By James King
29. Mission Bell Plaque
The bronze bell in the center niche of the campanário was cast especially for this mission and is the first mission bell made in California. It is 24 inches in diameter and weighs 500 pounds.

This bell, and the El Camino Real bell marker, were presented by California Mission Trails Association, Ltd. to commemorate the restoration dedication ceremony, June 4, 1950.
Mission Bell image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
30. Mission Bell
Matanza Tree (Killing or Slaughtering Tree) image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
31. Matanza Tree (Killing or Slaughtering Tree)
Under the large oak tree to the northeast, cattle were slaughtered for food in mission days. Until recent times large mounds of bones marked this spot.
The Matanza Tree image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
32. The Matanza Tree
Ruins Of An Adobe Structure On The Mission Grounds image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
33. Ruins Of An Adobe Structure On The Mission Grounds
Ruins Of An Adobe Structure & Corral On The Mission Grounds image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
34. Ruins Of An Adobe Structure & Corral On The Mission Grounds
Ruins Of An Adobe Structure On The Mission Grounds image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
35. Ruins Of An Adobe Structure On The Mission Grounds
Stone Threshing Floor image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
36. Stone Threshing Floor
Indians separated grain either by having mules tread on it or by beating it with flails.
Tahona or Horse-Powered Mill image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
37. Tahona or Horse-Powered Mill
This mill was operated by a blind-folded mule or burro. It was harnessed to the pole or sweep and moved in a perpetual circle, thereby turning the upper stone. A hopper-funnel set in the feeding hole fed grain to the grinding surfaces of the stones. Grist discharged from the stones was stored in a bin. A tahona mill was installed in 1810.
The Indians of Mission San Antonio image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
38. The Indians of Mission San Antonio
The Indians of Mission San Antonio belonged to the Salinan Tribe which was part of the Hokan family. Before the founding of the mission for food they ate fish, reptiles, birds and mammals as well as acorns, wild seeds and berries Mortar and pestle were used for crushing seeds. The Salinan Indians made baskets and rough willow storage receptacles for acorns. Their dwellings were brush huts.
California Redwood - Early Report image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
39. California Redwood - Early Report
Returning to San Carlos,Father Palou compiled the first report on the California missions. Writing of San Antonio he informed the Viceroy under date of December 10, 1773: The Mission has various localities suitable for raising cattle of every kind, as there is an abundance of pasturag, much oak and pine, and a timber of another sort, not known save for its color which is called redwood and is very good for building purposes.
Junipero Serra Peak image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
40. Junipero Serra Peak
The 5844 ft. mountain, highest in the Santa Lucia Range was named for Padre Junipero Serra (founder of this mission) on Jan. 2, 1907 (by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names) Seamen fro the Philippines in earliest days recorded this observation and pilots reckoned their course by this point.
Memorial Cross image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
41. Memorial Cross
To the memory of Padre Junipero Serra who erected a cross on the day of the founding of Mission San Antonio
July 14, 1771
Fray Junipero Serra image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
42. Fray Junipero Serra
1713-1784
Founder of the California Missions
In Memory of
Eugeneie B. Hannon
Donated by William H. Hannon Foundation
Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
43. Dedication Plaque
In gratitude and appreciation to the
William Randolph Hearst Foundation
Through whose interest and generosity the San Antonio Chapel was completely restored
1948-1949
Serra International Plaque image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
44. Serra International Plaque
This plaque honors the memory of
Fray Junipero Serra
"The Apostle of California"
who died 200 years ago after a life dedicated to spreading the Gospel of Jesus Christ.
1784-1984
Presented by Serra International
15,000 Catholic Laymen in 31 countries who in 1984 celebrate 50 years of Fostering Vocations to Priesthood & Religious Life.
"Always to go forward & never to turn back"
Dedication Plaque image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
45. Dedication Plaque
To
Joseph R. Knowland
Under whose leadership the California Historic Landmarks League saved from destruction and restored the chapel San Antonio Mission
1903-1907
Diagram of the Grounds of Misión San Antonio de Padua image. Click for full size.
46. Diagram of the Grounds of Misión San Antonio de Padua
Mission Well image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
47. Mission Well
Shown in oldest photographs. Originally lined with wooden planking. Long filled with debris, reopened in 1955.
Ship Figure Heads image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
48. Ship Figure Heads
Brought to mission by sailors as thanks – offerings to St Antony. Details & dates unknown.
Original Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
49. Original Barracks
One corporal and five soldiers were stationed in these quarters.
Aqueduct image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
50. Aqueduct
573 ft. drainage ditch to drain water from buildings extending from rancheria past chapel and barracks to small west reservoir.
Early Wheat Field image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
51. Early Wheat Field
In the first report of the California Missions, Padre Francisco Palou wrote under date of Dec. 10, 1773, of San Antonio Mission: the mission has succeeded at the new location in securing an abundance of water from the arroyo mentioned, which they have conducted by means of a ditch to irrigate a level piece of land adjoining the mission proper of which a good piece has been cultivated, and they are about to sow on it two fanegas of wheat.
Tannery image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
52. Tannery
Tannery vats are the original tanks constructed in 1808. Hides processed here were for various leather products needed in early mission days.
Indian Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
53. Indian Cemetery
Laid out in 1804
House of Mayordomo image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
54. House of Mayordomo
Cobblestone foundations, tile floor and mounds of disintegrated adobes indicate the outline of the house of the mayordomo or overseer. This building was 142 feet long and 25 feet wide. The mayordomo had charge of the work and supervised the Indians performance of duties.
Beehive Ovens image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
55. Beehive Ovens
Beehive ovens built of adobe were set up about the mission chiefly for baking bread. Charcoal was frequently used for heating these ovens.
Pottery and Tile Shop image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
56. Pottery and Tile Shop
Pottery and tile shop using molds. The Indians made tiles for roof and floor, and clay water pipe. These were then fired in the kiln. The wheel was used for making dishes and kitchen utensils.
Mission Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
57. Mission Reservoir
A few feet in back of this sign are the original retaining walls of the reservoir constructed in the early days of the mission.
To fill the reservoir Padre Buenaventura Sitjar tapped the San Antonio River about three miles above the mission and by means of an aqueduct carried the water to this basin.
Much of the primitive structure is visible. The irrigation system established by Padre Sitjar is considered by experts to be one of the finest engineering feats of early California history.
Mission Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
58. Mission Reservoir
Tile Brick Kiln image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
59. Tile Brick Kiln
Tiles for floors and roofs were made of clay shaped by hand in moulds, died and burned for several days in kilns located on the hillside. It is estimated that more than 200,000 tiles were made here by the Indians.
Millrace image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
60. Millrace
Partly restored canal on either side of road shows route to water on its way to Gristmill. Completed about 1809 by Padre Buenaventura Sitjar O.F.M.
Millrace and Gristmill image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
61. Millrace and Gristmill
Gristmill outflow image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
62. Gristmill outflow
Gristmill image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
63. Gristmill
Well and Reservoir image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
64. Well and Reservoir
Constructed in 1824.
At first, reservoir was 14’ long; soon it was extended to 37’. In 1826 it was partly lined with masonry. Total capacity 15,000 gals.
Well image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
65. Well
Original draw well (noria). 2 men operating this pump could fill reservoir in 7 hours.
Temescal or Sweat-house image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
66. Temescal or Sweat-house
An ancient practice was observed in sweat-houses where as many Indians as possible crowded within. While a fire was make inside close to the door. Fuel was added until all were covered with profuse perspiration. Finally thoroughly exhausted they crawled out and plunged in to the nearest stream.
Pomegranate Tree image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, March 20, 2013
67. Pomegranate Tree
The pomegranate tree was a favorite fruit tree in mission gardens. This tree is preserved from mission days.
Milpitas Ranchhouse image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
68. Milpitas Ranchhouse
Designed by Julia Morgan and built in 1930 on a hill overlooking Mission San Antonio and the San Antonio valley for William Randolph Hearst as ranch headquarters and guesthouse. The Milpitas Ranchhouse was listed in 1977 on the National Register of Historic Places as #77000310. The Moorish Revival style dome is visible through the oak trees on the left and the Fort Hunter Liggett fire station is visible to the extreme right. Now inside the cantonment, Milpitas Ranchhouse is accessible to civilian visitors through an Army checkpoint.
Milpitas Ranchhouse image. Click for full size.
By James King, November 24, 2012
69. Milpitas Ranchhouse
The Moorish Revival style dome over the living quarters at the north end of the building.
 
 
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