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Marion in Crittenden County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

County Named, 1842

 
 
County Named, 1842 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
1. County Named, 1842 Marker
Inscription.
For John J. Crittenden, 1787-1863, one of Kentucky’s great statesmen. 15th Governor of the state. Attorney General under three Presidents. US Senator five times. Noted for Crittenden Compromise, 1860, futile effort to avert Civil War and preserve the Union.

Crittenden, the 91st county established in state, was formed out of eastern part of Livingston.
 
Erected 1968 by Kentucky Historical Society and Kentucky Department of Highways. (Marker Number 1160.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Kentucky Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 37° 19.971′ N, 88° 4.907′ W. Marker is in Marion, Kentucky, in Crittenden County. Marker is on Kentucky Route 91 0.1 miles east of Court Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is beside sidewalk near north courthouse entrance. Marker is at or near this postal address: 107 South Main Street, Marion KY 42064, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Crittenden County Courthouse, Marion (within shouting distance of this marker); Courthouse Burned (within shouting distance of this marker).
 
Also see . . .
County Named, 1842 Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
2. County Named, 1842 Marker (wide view)

1. Crittenden County Kentucky was established in 1842.
The county was named for John Jordan Crittenden (1787-1863)who was U.S. Attorney General, Senator and the 15th Governor of Kentucky (Submitted on November 27, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. History of Crittenden County, Kentucky.
The first county court was held at the house of Samuel Ashley on April 4, 1842. The following justices of the peace were in attendance: Joseph Hughes, James Cruce, Robert H. Hughes, Abner Peter Clinton, John D. Gregory, Robert Hill, Henry R.D. Coleman and Samuel L. Phillips. (Under the Constitution, prior to 1850, there were no county judges and the county courts were held by the magistrates.)

Crittenden was once one of the nation's largest producers of fluorspar. (Submitted on November 27, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. John Jordan Crittenden, Jr.
US Senator, Kentucky Governor, Presidential Cabinet Secretary. The most famous member of the Crittenden political dynasty, he was born near Versailles, Kentucky. (Submitted on November 27, 2014, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Patriots & PatriotismPoliticsWar, US Civil
 
John J. Crittenden image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
3. John J. Crittenden
This 1857 portrait of John J. Crittenden by George Peter Alexander Healy hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC.

“During the campaign of 1860, many southerners declared that Abraham Lincoln's election to the presidency would give them no choice but to secede from the Union. One notable exception was Kentucky senator John Crittenden. This passionate advocate of national unity undertook the task of reaching an accommodation designed to derail the secession movement of 1861. Central to his plan was a proposal that would have permanently guaranteed the rights of slaveholders below the nation's 36°30' parallel. By now, however, bitterness over the slavery question ran too deeply, and neither North nor South could accept this conciliating measure. Instead, Crittenden had to content himself with ensuring that his own Kentucky did not secede; it was largely through his exertions that this state remained loyal to the Union after most of the South had left. ” — National Portrait Gallery
Masonic Temple image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
4. Masonic Temple

Masonic Temple, Bigham Lodge 256,
Crittenden County Courthouse Square.
Post Office image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
5. Post Office

Marion, Kentucky Post Office,
Crittenden County Courthouse Square.
Marion Hardware & Grocery Company image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
6. Marion Hardware & Grocery Company

Marion Hardware & Grocery Company building,
Crittenden County Courthouse Square.
Brigadier General Hylan B. Lyon, CSA image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
7. Brigadier General Hylan B. Lyon, CSA

According to local tradition, the Crittenden County Courthouse was burned by Brigadier General Hylan B. Lyon, CSA on January 25, 1965 as part of a raid into Kentucky during which Lyon’s troops burned a number of western Kentucky county courthouses.
Bicentennial Dogwood (<i>Courthouse in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
8. Bicentennial Dogwood (Courthouse in background)
Bicentennial Dogwood Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 7, 2012
9. Bicentennial Dogwood Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 257 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   2. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Al Wolf was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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