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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Juno in Val Verde County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Hood's Devils River Fight

 
 
Hood's Devils River Fight Marker image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, November 30, 2014
1. Hood's Devils River Fight Marker
Inscription. The men of Company G, a small unit of the U.S. 2nd Cavalry, left Fort Mason on July 5, 1857, under the command of Lt. John Bell Hood (1831-1879), in pursuit of Comanche Indians in the vicinity. Traveling northwest, they discovered a fresh Indian trail leading southward toward Mexico. Crossing bluffs near the Devils River on July 20, the men encountered an Indian camp on a ridge about two miles from the stream, marked by a while flag. Suspecting an ambush, Hood proceeded cautiously toward the ridge.

A small band of Indians advanced to meet Hood’s party. Then, throwing down the flag to signal their concealed allies, a group of close to 100 Comanches and Lipan Apaches attached. Outnumbered, and hampered by brush fires set by Indian women, the soldiers were forced into fierce hand-to-hand combat. Outflanked by a force at least three times his number and hemmed in by a wall of fire and smoke to his front, all that Hood could hope for was that superior marksmanship and discipline would prove to be the decisive elements in the fight. The company fell back to reload its weapons, only to hear the loud cries of Comanche women through the smoke and dust, indicating an Indian retreat.

Two cavalrymen, William Barry and Thomas Ryan, were killed, and five others, including Hood, were wounded. A relief unit from Camp Hudson (20
Hood's Devils River Fight Marker site image. Click for full size.
By William F Haenn, November 30, 2014
2. Hood's Devils River Fight Marker site
mi. S) arrived the following day, rendering medical aid and helping to bury the dead. Pvt. Ryan was buried at the site, and Pvt. Barry’s body was never found. Later reports revealed that nineteen Indians were killed, and many more wounded. Hood and his men were later cited for valor in Army reports. During the Civil War, Hood became a general in the Confederate States Army.
 
Erected 1987 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 2556.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the San Antonio-El Paso Road marker series.
 
Location. 30° 10.574′ N, 101° 5.559′ W. Marker is near Juno, Texas, in Val Verde County. Marker is at the intersection of Texas Route 163 and County Road 189, on the right when traveling north on State Route 163. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Ozona TX 76943, United States of America.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar, US CivilWars, US Indian
 
General John Bell Hood, CSA image. Click for full size.
1864
3. General John Bell Hood, CSA
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. This page has been viewed 254 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William F Haenn of Fort Clark (Brackettville), Texas. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 17, 2016.
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