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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Logan Circle in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence

8 Logan Circle, NW

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington D. C. —

 
Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
1. Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence Marker
Inscription. Belford V. Lawson (1909–1985) and Marjorie M. Lawson (1912–2002) were prominent attorneys. Mr. Lawson helped win landmark civil rights cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, including New Negro Alliance v. Sanitary Grocery (1938) and Henderson v. Southern Railway Company (1950). Mrs. Lawson advised John F. Kennedy's 1960 presidential campaign, and he appointed her to the D.C. Juvenile Court bench. President Lyndon Johnson chose her for the U.S. delegation to the United Nations.

The Lawsons live here between 1938 and 1958, at time renting their third floor to U.S. Rep. Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (D-N.Y.).
 
Erected by Cultural Heritage, DC.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, D.C. African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 54.606′ N, 77° 1.814′ W. Marker is in Logan Circle, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Logan Circle when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 8 Logan Circle Northwest, Washington DC 20005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pratt House (here, next to this marker); Charles M. “Sweet Daddy” Grace Residence
Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
2. Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence Marker
(a few steps from this marker); 6 Logan (a few steps from this marker); Logan Circle (within shouting distance of this marker); A Neighborhood Reborn (within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing); Major General John A. Logan (within shouting distance of this marker); If These Mansions Could Talk (within shouting distance of this marker); The Artistic Life (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Logan Circle.
 
Also see . . .
1. Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence. African American Heritage Trail, Cultural Tourism, DC. (Submitted on December 4, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. Belford Lawson, Jr. Wikipedia. (Submitted on December 4, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsPolitics
 
Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
3. Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson
Close-up of photo on marker
Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
4. Belford V. Lawson and Marjorie M. Lawson Residence
8 Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
Historic American Building Survey
5. 8 Logan Circle
Detail of HABS drawing.
<b>Ⅷ</b> image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 30, 2014
6.
Over the door at 8 Logan Circle
General Eliphalet Whittlesey<br>The Original Owner of 8 Logan Circle image. Click for full size.
By Charles Barney Whittelsey, 1898
7. General Eliphalet Whittlesey
The Original Owner of 8 Logan Circle
Whittlesey was a professor of Rhetoric at Bowdoin College before the Civil War. During the war he was Chaplain of the 19th Maine, Judge Advocate on Oliver O. Howard's staff, and Colonel of the 46th Colored Infantry. He was brevetted Brigadier General at the end of the war. After the war he somewhat controversially served as assistant commissioner of the Freedman's Bureau in North Carolina, was on the Faculty at Howard University and was secretary to the Board of Indian Commissioners until his death in this house on the 29th of September 1909. He is buried in Arlington Cemetery along with his wife Augusta Patton Whittlesey.
photo from Genealogy of the Whittelsey-Whittlesey family
by Charles Barney Whittelsey, 1898.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 425 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on November 21, 2016.
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