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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Greenville in Greenville County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Old Record Building

 
 
The Old Record Building Marker (Repainted) image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, March 22, 2009
1. The Old Record Building Marker (Repainted)
Inscription.
70 feet south of this point was erected, 1820, the old "Record Building," designed by Robert Mills (1871-1855), famous Charleston architect, designer of the Washington Monument. This building of classic design was county courthouse until 1855; then Record Building until removed 1924. John C. Calhoun spoke from its portico on current issues.
 
Erected 1938 by Greenville Life Underwriters Association. (Marker Number 23-1.)
 
Location. 34° 50.923′ N, 82° 23.977′ W. Marker is in Greenville, South Carolina, in Greenville County. Marker can be reached from South Main Street. Click for map. This marker is behind a seating area. Marker is in this post office area: Greenville SC 29601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Vardry McBee (here, next to this marker); Poinsett's Spring (a few steps from this marker); Joel Roberts Poinsett (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Joel Roberts Poinsett (within shouting distance of this marker); Chamber of Commerce Building (within shouting distance of this marker); South Carolina's First National Bank
Vicinity of Records Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, May 26, 2008
2. Vicinity of Records Building Marker
Also shown here is a statue of Vardry McBee, the “Father of Greenville.” The building in the right rear is the old American Cigar Factory (1902), the largest brick building in downtown Greenville and listed on the National Register July 1, 1982.
(about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named South Carolina's First National Bank (about 300 feet away); Spirit of Freedom (about 300 feet away); City of Greenville 9-11 Plaque (about 300 feet away); Greenville County Courthouse / The Willie Earle Lynching Trial (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Greenville.
 
Regarding The Old Record Building. The building described no longer stands. In its place is the ten-story former Chamber of Commerce building.
 
Also see . . .
1. Robert Mills. Robert Mills (August 12, 1781 – March 3, 1855) is sometimes called the first native born American to become a professional architect, though Charles Bulfinch perhaps has a clearer claim to this honor. (Submitted on February 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

2. The Jail / Robert Mills Historical Marker. Marker located in Lancaster, SC, dedicated to its Ribert Mills-designed jail. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

3. Columbia Bible College, 1937-1960 / Westervelt Home, 1930 - 1937 Historic Marker
The Old Record Building Marker—Poinsett Hotel in Background image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, February 20, 2010
3. The Old Record Building Marker—Poinsett Hotel in Background
. Marker located in Columbia, SC, dedicated to the Ainsley Hall House, designed by Robert Mills. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

4. Union County Jail Marker. Marker located in Union, SC, dedicated to its Robert Mills-designed jail. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

5. Old Muster Ground and Courthouse Marker. Marker located in Kingstree, SC, dedicated to its Robert Mills-designed courthouse. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

6. Colleton County Courthouse Marker. Marker located in Walterboro, SC, dedicated to the courthouse which includes a Ribert Mills-designed portico. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

7. Georgetown County Courthouse. Marker located in Georgetown, SC, dedicated to its Robert Mills-designed courthouse. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

8. The South Caroliniana Library 1840. Marker located in Columbia, SC, dedicated to the South Carolinian Library, built in 1840 using plans designed by Robert Mills. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

9. Washington Monument. The Washington Monument is an obelisk near the west end of the
Robert Mills<br>1781–1855 image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
4. Robert Mills
1781–1855
National Mall in Washington, D.C., built to commemorate the first U.S. president, General George Washington. (Submitted on March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 

10. John C. Calhoun. John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was a leading United States Southern politician from South Carolina during the first half of the 19th century. (Submitted on February 2, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About William B. Coxe
The historical photographs shown were taken by William B. Coxe, a photographer by trade, who moved to Greenville at the end of World War I. Almost immediately, Coxe began to compile a photographic history of his new hometown. Coxe died in 1973 at age 78. In 1989, the Greenville County Historical Society acquired the collections Coxe himself had amassed, in addition to about 120,000 negatives of photos taken by Coxe and his daughter, Isabelle Coxe Cely.
    — Submitted September 13, 2009, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

2. Early Greenville County Courthouses
The South Carolina General Assembly created Greenville County in 1786 and appointed
Panorama View of Main Street, Looking North -<br>Old Record Building in Far Right image. Click for full size.
William B. Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society, 1900
5. Panorama View of Main Street, Looking North -
Old Record Building in Far Right
nine county judges The site of the first court session is unclear and a matter of dispute. Eventually a courthouse was constructed on land belonging to Lemuel Alston in the middle of what is today called Court Square on Greenville's current South Main Street. In 1822 construction of the graceful building shown above was begun. It was undoubtedly Greenville's most notable architectural landmark. Later, when a new courthouse was completed in 1855, this building was used to house county records and also offices for the chamber of commerce. The Second Empire-style cupola was added in the latter part of the 19th century. Robert Mills, the United State's first professional architect, is reputed to have been the architect. The building was thoughtlessly demolished in 1924 for a multi-story office building. This act of destruction did not go unnoticed or unchallenged. The Upper South Carolina Historical Society was formed in 1928 to work for historical preservation. This organization later evolved into the Greenville County Historical Society. (Source: Remembering Greenville: Photographs from the Coxe Collection by Jeffrey R. Willis and the Greenville County Historical Society (2006), pg 10.)
    — Submitted March 14, 2010, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.

 
Categories. Notable BuildingsNotable Persons
 
Second Greenville County Courthouse -<br>Later Known as the Old Record Building image. Click for full size.
William B. Coxe Collection, Greenville County Historical Society, circa 1905
6. Second Greenville County Courthouse -
Later Known as the Old Record Building
Old Chamber of Commerce Building<br>Site of the Old Record Building image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, December 24, 2008
7. Old Chamber of Commerce Building
Site of the Old Record Building
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,862 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   2. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   3. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   5, 6. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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