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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Youngstown in Mahoning County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Crandall Park

Fifth Avenue Historic District

 
 
Crandall Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 8, 2014
1. Crandall Park Marker
Side A
Inscription. Side A
Crandall Park is the heart of the historic district and includes Fifth Avenue, Redondo Road, Catalina Avenue, and Tod Lane. Most of the district’s historic structures were built between 1904 and 1930, Youngstown’s heyday as an urban and industrial center. The district encompasses 92 houses, 32 outbuildings, a pavilion and rustic stone shelter in Crandall Park, and the concrete arch bridge carrying Fifth Avenue over the park. The North Heights Land Company and the Realty Guarantee Trust Company developed much of the neighborhood. Homes in the district were built for the city’s prominent industrialists and businessmen. The houses feature the work of architects Morris Scheibel, Charles F. Owsley, Fred Medicus, Barton Brooke, and Cook and Canfield and are distinguished by their grand scale, high-style design, spacious lots, landscaping, and orientation to the park or boulevard roads. (Continued on other side)

Side B
(Continued from other side) Houses in the district exhibit a variety of styles: English Revival, Colonial Revival, Arts and Crafts, Spanish Colonial Revival, American Four-Square, and Chateauesque. The house at 1411 Fifth Avenue, built in 1904, is the earliest house in the district and displays elements of both the English Revival and Craftsman-styles. Oak Manor, at 1508-1510 Fifth Avenue
Crandall Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 8, 2014
2. Crandall Park Marker
Side B
was built around 1905 and later inhabited by Thomas Bray, president of Republic Iron and Steel Co. Other prominent residents of the district included Frank Purnell, Youngstown Sheet and Tube’s president, Edward Clark, Newton Steel’s president, George Brainard, General Fireproofing’s president, state representative and attorney William R. Stewart, and Philip Wick, Myron Arms, Charles Schmutz, Almon Frankle, Joseph Schwebel, Bert Printz, and Joseph Lustig.
 
Erected 2011 by Fifth Avenue Boulevard Neighbors and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 32-50.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 41° 7.896′ N, 80° 39.093′ W. Marker is in Youngstown, Ohio, in Mahoning County. Marker is at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and Granada Avenue, on the left when traveling north on Fifth Avenue. Click for map. Located in the median on Fifth Avenue. Marker is in this post office area: Youngstown OH 44504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Augustine Episcopal Chapel (approx. 1.2 miles away); St. Elizabeth Hospital (approx. 1.3 miles away); Little Steel Strike
Crandall Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 8, 2014
3. Crandall Park Marker
Side A
(approx. 2 miles away); Harry Burt and Good Humor / Ross Radio Company (approx. 2 miles away); Warner Brothers (approx. 2.1 miles away); Oscar D. Boggess Homestead / Boggess Quarry (approx. 2.6 miles away); Pioneer Pavilion / Mill Creek Furnace (approx. 3.7 miles away); Newport Village Historic District (approx. 5.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Youngstown.
 
Categories. Notable Places
 
Crandall Park Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 8, 2014
4. Crandall Park Marker
Side B
Crandall Park Houses image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, December 8, 2014
5. Crandall Park Houses
Some of the distinctive houses in Crandall Park
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 171 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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