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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Washington in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Capital Guardian

Fort Washington

 
 
Capital Guardian Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
1. Capital Guardian Marker
Inscription. Building the Second Fort
On September 8, 1814, only 12 days after the destruction of Fort Warburton, Pierre L'Enfant was commissioned by the Government to reestablish a fortification here. Work began that October but increasing friction between L'Enfant and the Government caused suspension of the project in July 1815. Shortly thereafter, L'Enfant was replaced by Lt. Col. Walker K. Armistead. Completed in October 1824, at a cost of $426,000, this structure stood as the only permanent fortification protecting Washington through 1872.

Arming the Fort
Brick platforms for artillery carriages were constructed in the 1840s and thirty 24-pounder guns were sent to the fort. With an effective range of 1901 yards, guns of this size could effectively control the river passage in front of the fort. In 1861 additional 24- and 32-pounder guns were sent to strengthen the armament of the fort.
 
Location. 38° 42.739′ N, 77° 1.977′ W. Marker is near Fort Washington, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker can be reached from Fort Washington Road, on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located in Fort Washington Park, just outside the visitors center / museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 13551 Fort Washington Road, Fort Washington MD 20744, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Captial Guardian Markers image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain
2. Captial Guardian Markers
From left to right the "First Fort", "Fort Washington", and "The Endicott System." In the background is the entrance to Fort Washington, the masonary fort.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Capital Guardian (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Capital Guardian (here, next to this marker); Battery Decatur and Disappearing Guns (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Washington Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Main Gateway (about 400 feet away); The Northwest Demi-Bastion (about 400 feet away); The Water Battery (about 700 feet away); Caponiere (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Washington.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a drawing of an artillerist in a pre-Civil War regular army uniform. On the right is a map showing the location of Fort Washington, with the range of the 24-pounder guns indicated by a circle. On the lower right is a drawing which shows a 24-pounder seacoast gun being served by a crew of five.
 
Also see . . .  Fort Washington. National Park Service site. (The site is undergoing some modification and some content is off line at this time.) (Submitted on May 27, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitary
 
Fort Washington - Capital Guardian image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, March 1, 2008
3. Fort Washington - Capital Guardian
Artillerist image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
4. Artillerist
Close-up of image on marker
24 Pounder image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
5. 24 Pounder
Close-up of image on marker
Range Map of 24 Lb Guns image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, December 7, 2013
6. Range Map of 24 Lb Guns
Close-up of image on marker
24 Lb Gun at Fort Washington image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 11, 2011
7. 24 Lb Gun at Fort Washington
Woodrow Wilson Bridge and Washington Monument in Background
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,024 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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