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Northwest in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Boy Scout Memorial
 
Boy Scout Memorial Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Tabitha Preast, May 26, 2008
1. Boy Scout Memorial Marker
 
Inscription. The two symbolic figures represent the sum of the great ideals of past civilizations, developed through the centuries and now at best is delivered by American manhood and womanhood to the present generation.

The Boy Scout, aware of his fellowship with Scouts around the world and symbolic of all Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Explorers striding into the future, represents their hope that all is fine in our nation's past will continue to live in future generations.

The male figure symbolizes love of country, citizenship, patrotism, loyalty, honor, integrity, courage, clean living, and physical development.

The female figure symbolizes the spiritual qualities of good citizenship - enlightenment with the light of faith, love of God, high ideals, liberty, freedom, democracy, love of humanity, lighting the way.
 
Erected 1964 by Boy Scouts of America.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Markers Attached to Sculpture marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.635′ N, 77° 2.054′ W. Marker is in Northwest, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Ellipse Road NW near 15th Street NW. Click for map. The memorial is located in Presidents Park, east of the ellipse. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are
 
Boy Scout Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Tabitha Preast, May 26, 2008
2. Boy Scout Memorial
 
within walking distance of this marker. Original Patentees Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Bulfinch Gate House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); The National Christmas Tree (about 700 feet away); Open For Business (about 700 feet away); Why is the Washington Monument Temporarily Closed? (about 700 feet away); To the Memory of Oscar S. Straus (about 700 feet away); William Tecumseh Sherman (about 700 feet away); Washington Monument (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Northwest.
 
More about this marker. The Boy Scout oath is engraved on the pedestal of the statue: "On my honor I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight."

Next to the statue is a pool which bears the inscription: "In grateful tribute to the men and women whose generosity, devotion, and leadership have brought Scouting to the nation's youth and to honor all members of the Boy Scouts of America who in days of peace and times of peril have done their duty to God and their country this memorial was authorized by the Congress of the United States and erected in recognition of the fiftieth anniverary of the Boy Scouts of America."
 
Regarding Boy Scout Memorial. During the 50th Anniversary Year of Scouting (1959), a proposal was made to establish the memorial on the site of where the first Boy Scount Jamboree in Washington, D.C. was held. Lyndon B. Johnson, who was the Senate majority leader at the time, introduced the measure to the Senate. The memorial was constructed at no expense to the government. The funds were raised from each Scout unit and each donor signed a scroll that was later placed in the pedestal of the statue. The memorial was eventually unveiled in a ceremony on November 7, 1964.
 
Pool near the memorial, showing some of the inscription. Photo, Click for full size
By Tabitha Preast, May 26, 2008
3. Pool near the memorial, showing some of the inscription.
 

 
Also see . . .
1. Boy Scouts of America National Council. (Submitted on May 27, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.)
2. Scouting Memorials, world-wide. (Submitted on May 29, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. National Park Service Web Site Comment
“The memorial to the Boy Scouts of America stands on the site of the first Boy Scout Jamboree in 1937. It is one of the few memorials in Washington, D.C. commemorating a living cause. The funds to build this memorial were raised by Scout units throughout the United States, and each donor signed one of several scrolls that were placed in the pedestal of the statue. The memorials was unveiled in a ceremony on November 7, 1964. The statue was accepted for the country by Associate Supreme Court Justice Tom Clark, who noted that the day marked his fiftieth anniversary as an Eagle Scout.

“The bronze statue consists of three figures. The Boy Scout represents the aspirations of all past, present, and future Scouts throughout the world. The male figure exemplifies physical, mental, and moral fitness, love of country, good citizenship, loyalty, honor, and courage. He carries a helmet, a symbol of masculine attire. The female figure symbolizes enlightenment with the love of God and fellow man, justice, freedom, and democracy. She holds the eternal flame of Godís Holy Spirit.”
 
Boy Scout Memorial Photo, Click for full size
By Tabitha Preast, May 26, 2008
4. Boy Scout Memorial
Bronze by Donald De Lue (1897–1988). Tallest figure is approx. 14 feet high. The base is approx. 5 feet high.
 
    — Submitted May 27, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland.
 
The Boy Scout oath is engraved on the pedestal of the statue Photo, Click for full size
By Tabitha Preast, May 26, 2008
5. The Boy Scout oath is engraved on the pedestal of the statue
On my honor I will do my best To do my duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; To help other people at all times; To keep myself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,422 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 27, 2008, by Tabitha Preast of Hanover, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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