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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Laramie in Goshen County, Wyoming — The American West (Mountains)
 

Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie

 
 
Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
1. Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie Marker
Inscription. Between the years 1847 and 1868, most of the approximate 80,000 Mormon Pioneers passed through Fort Laramie. This was the first stop for the vanguard company after leaving Winter Quarters, (near Omaha) Nebraska.

In June, 1847, after following a faint trapper trail on the north side of the Platte River, the Pioneers reached Fort Laramie. Brigham Young, with a number of his party, crossed the river and walked up to the fort.

At this time the fort was called Fort John. It was owned by the American Fur Company and managed by James Bordeaux who greeted Brigham Young and the others. From Bordeaux they learned that they needed to cross the river at this point because the marshy terrain on the north side of the river would soon make travel impossible, so the Pioneers made arrangements to cross the river on a large flatboat.

Realizing that many others would need to cross the river at this point, the Pioneers built the first ferry in this area. Brigham Young left men to run the ferry which was used for over twenty years, aiding not only Mormons but all others who followed.

The present Fort Laramie in now a National Historic Site and dates mainly from the Civil War era. This marker, in the town of Fort Laramie, marks the approximate place that the Pioneers actually crossed the river.
 
Erected
Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
2. Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie Marker
1992 by National Society of the Sons of Utah Pioneers, Mills Chapter. (Marker Number 49.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Mormon Pioneer Trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Sons of Utah Pioneers marker series.
 
Location. 42° 12.774′ N, 104° 30.999′ W. Marker is in Fort Laramie, Wyoming, in Goshen County. Marker is at the intersection of East Merriam Street (U.S. 26) and Lawton Avernue on East Merriam Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 105 East Merriam Street, Fort Laramie WY 82212, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Laramie National Historic Site (approx. half a mile away); Old Army Bridge Over the Platte River (approx. 0.9 miles away); Spanning a Century: End of an Era (approx. 0.9 miles away); Fort Platte (approx. 1.1 miles away); Handcarts – The New Plan (approx. 2.1 miles away); Post Quartermaster’s Area (approx. 2.1 miles away); The Cavalry Stables (approx. 2.1 miles away); Noncommissioned Officers’ Quarters (approx. 2.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Laramie.
 
Regarding Mormon Pioneers at Fort Laramie. This marker is on the east side of the information center. There is an Oregon Trail marker on the west side of the information center.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesRoads & VehiclesSettlements & Settlers
 
Oregon Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
3. Oregon Trail Marker
Oregon Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
4. Oregon Trail Marker
To all Pioneers
who passed this way
to win and hold the West

Erected by
Trail crossed one mile south of this point
Ft. Laramie Citizens and Friends
1932
Points of Interest image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, August 22, 2014
5. Points of Interest
This hand-drawn sketch map, posted at the information center, identifies several local points of historic interest. Click on the image to enlarge the map.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. This page has been viewed 279 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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